omorka: (Literary dragon)
Stolen from [livejournal.com profile] scarfman, originally from [livejournal.com profile] anaka:

If you tend toward books (and if you don't at least somewhat, the odds of you being an LJ devotee to whatever degree are pretty slim), then it's a good bet that you've got a number of books that really resonated with you, often to the extent of informing your development as a person and your view of the world. These are not always classics of literature. Often they are, viewed objectively, really deeply awful books. That's not the point. The point is that they were the right (or wrong, nothing says they had to have a positive influence) thing for you to read at the right time, and they stayed with you in a meaningful way.

The number of these varies, but most people if queried can come up with three of them. One or more of them were likely encountered between the ages of 11 and 13, and may have been the first "grown up" book you read. Beyond that, I can't think of any set pattern, and even those may just be a coincidental cluster of data points. Nonetheless, I'm newly fascinated by this question and I wish to ask it here.

Help me out then, my friends. Name your top three core texts. If you wish to include age when encountered, positive or negative influence, general summary of the text, or type of influence it exerted on you, that would be likewise awesome. I wanna know about YOU! And books! Humor me. :)


Unfortunately, there are at least three books that are easily candidates for this list that I cannot give, because I no longer remember their titles. I could tell you where they were in the county library young readers' section (or, in one case, my parents' bookshelf), and I could describe what their library covers looked like, but authors and titles have long been swallowed by time. So, of the ones not so lost:

1) A Wind In The Door, and by extension the rest of the Murray Children cycle, by Madeline L'Engle. These are books that reassure smart kids that their difference isn't a detriment; that the universe is vast and yet accessible and comrehensible, if taken in small chunks; and that humans can - no, must - be trusted with their own destinies. There are also some wonderful themes on music, on identity and naming, and on remembrance. It's probably somewhat ironic that such Christian (if not exactly orthodox) books are part of what set me on my current spiritual path, but there we are.

2) Jennifer, Hecate, MacBeth, Milliam McKinely, and Me, Elizabeth. by E.L. Konigsburg. It sounds dumb when I say it, but - this is probably the most formative book regarding female friendships in my entire life, much less my childhood. It also was one of my "okay, so I'm a witch; what does that mean?" figuring-out books.

3) Spiral Dance, by Starhawk. Some of the Dianic/separatist bits of the political rhetoric have not aged well, but as a textbook for feminist Pagan values and practice, you can't much go wrong with the original. Finding this in college, along with Margot Adler's Drawing Down the Moon, was a revelation.

Honorable mention: the Bible, the Principia Discordia, The Ethical Slut, Blessed Bi Spirit, the fourteen original Oz books by L. Frank Baum, the GURPS 3rd edition revised Basic handbook, and the Eneuma Elish.
omorka: (Literary dragon)
Stolen from [livejournal.com profile] scarfman, originally from [livejournal.com profile] anaka:

If you tend toward books (and if you don't at least somewhat, the odds of you being an LJ devotee to whatever degree are pretty slim), then it's a good bet that you've got a number of books that really resonated with you, often to the extent of informing your development as a person and your view of the world. These are not always classics of literature. Often they are, viewed objectively, really deeply awful books. That's not the point. The point is that they were the right (or wrong, nothing says they had to have a positive influence) thing for you to read at the right time, and they stayed with you in a meaningful way.

The number of these varies, but most people if queried can come up with three of them. One or more of them were likely encountered between the ages of 11 and 13, and may have been the first "grown up" book you read. Beyond that, I can't think of any set pattern, and even those may just be a coincidental cluster of data points. Nonetheless, I'm newly fascinated by this question and I wish to ask it here.

Help me out then, my friends. Name your top three core texts. If you wish to include age when encountered, positive or negative influence, general summary of the text, or type of influence it exerted on you, that would be likewise awesome. I wanna know about YOU! And books! Humor me. :)


Unfortunately, there are at least three books that are easily candidates for this list that I cannot give, because I no longer remember their titles. I could tell you where they were in the county library young readers' section (or, in one case, my parents' bookshelf), and I could describe what their library covers looked like, but authors and titles have long been swallowed by time. So, of the ones not so lost:

1) A Wind In The Door, and by extension the rest of the Murray Children cycle, by Madeline L'Engle. These are books that reassure smart kids that their difference isn't a detriment; that the universe is vast and yet accessible and comrehensible, if taken in small chunks; and that humans can - no, must - be trusted with their own destinies. There are also some wonderful themes on music, on identity and naming, and on remembrance. It's probably somewhat ironic that such Christian (if not exactly orthodox) books are part of what set me on my current spiritual path, but there we are.

2) Jennifer, Hecate, MacBeth, Milliam McKinely, and Me, Elizabeth. by E.L. Konigsburg. It sounds dumb when I say it, but - this is probably the most formative book regarding female friendships in my entire life, much less my childhood. It also was one of my "okay, so I'm a witch; what does that mean?" figuring-out books.

3) Spiral Dance, by Starhawk. Some of the Dianic/separatist bits of the political rhetoric have not aged well, but as a textbook for feminist Pagan values and practice, you can't much go wrong with the original. Finding this in college, along with Margot Adler's Drawing Down the Moon, was a revelation.

Honorable mention: the Bible, the Principia Discordia, The Ethical Slut, Blessed Bi Spirit, the fourteen original Oz books by L. Frank Baum, the GURPS 3rd edition revised Basic handbook, and the Eneuma Elish.
omorka: (Oh Captain)
Comment here and I'll pick three of your fandoms. You have to repost this with your answers to the questions in your journal.

[livejournal.com profile] aaaaaah picked Torchwood, Star Trek (any incarnation; I'm using TOS just because it's been a long time since I saw TNG, even though it was actually first for me), and Harry Potter.

Questions & Answers Behind The Cut )

Edited because I should not type while sick
omorka: (Oh Captain)
Comment here and I'll pick three of your fandoms. You have to repost this with your answers to the questions in your journal.

[livejournal.com profile] aaaaaah picked Torchwood, Star Trek (any incarnation; I'm using TOS just because it's been a long time since I saw TNG, even though it was actually first for me), and Harry Potter.

Questions & Answers Behind The Cut )

Edited because I should not type while sick
omorka: (Hungy hungy hobbits)
Ganked from [livejournal.com profile] bearit. Yeah, I'm writing about writing instead of, you know, actually writing. *sigh* Sorry, brain is still a little fried from the week.

Survey Behind The Cut to not spam your flist )
omorka: (Hungy hungy hobbits)
Ganked from [livejournal.com profile] bearit. Yeah, I'm writing about writing instead of, you know, actually writing. *sigh* Sorry, brain is still a little fried from the week.

Survey Behind The Cut to not spam your flist )
omorka: (25 Years of Bustin')
When you see this, post five unpopular fandom opinions in your journal.

I am assuming "unpopular" modifies "opinion" and not "fandom," although since most of my fandoms are small ones by LJ standards . . .

Behind the Cut for space )
omorka: (25 Years of Bustin')
When you see this, post five unpopular fandom opinions in your journal.

I am assuming "unpopular" modifies "opinion" and not "fandom," although since most of my fandoms are small ones by LJ standards . . .

Behind the Cut for space )
omorka: (iSnape)
Did this one for [livejournal.com profile] bkwrrm_tx"

Reply to this meme by yelling "Words!" and I will give you (eventually) five words that remind me of you. Then post them in your LJ and explain what they mean to you.

And she gave me:

Teaching Fandom Books Spouse Music )
omorka: (iSnape)
Did this one for [livejournal.com profile] bkwrrm_tx"

Reply to this meme by yelling "Words!" and I will give you (eventually) five words that remind me of you. Then post them in your LJ and explain what they mean to you.

And she gave me:

Teaching Fandom Books Spouse Music )
omorka: (WTF?)
Ganked from several people, primarily [livejournal.com profile] bkwrrm_tx:

And I think I'll snark for grammar and readability while I'm at it )
omorka: (WTF?)
Ganked from several people, primarily [livejournal.com profile] bkwrrm_tx:

And I think I'll snark for grammar and readability while I'm at it )
omorka: (Wizard of Speed and Time)
Ganked from half my friendslist:

Bold the ones you saw in the theater, italicize the ones you saw in another medium, leave alone the ones you've never seen at all.

List behind the cut )

(Manually edited for serious formatting fail; what the hell, LJ?)
omorka: (Wizard of Speed and Time)
Ganked from half my friendslist:

Bold the ones you saw in the theater, italicize the ones you saw in another medium, leave alone the ones you've never seen at all.

List behind the cut )

(Manually edited for serious formatting fail; what the hell, LJ?)
omorka: (Hana)
It's like MadLibs - fill in the blank and create your own seven-question survey . . . post the new ones in the comments and I'll answer when I have breathing space.

1. What do you think of _____________ ?


2. When did you last ____________?


3. __________ or ___________ and why?


4. What did you ______________?


5. What's your favorite ______________?


6. How would you ______________?


7. Who would you most like to ________ ?

omorka: (Hana)
It's like MadLibs - fill in the blank and create your own seven-question survey . . . post the new ones in the comments and I'll answer when I have breathing space.

1. What do you think of _____________ ?


2. When did you last ____________?


3. __________ or ___________ and why?


4. What did you ______________?


5. What's your favorite ______________?


6. How would you ______________?


7. Who would you most like to ________ ?

omorka: (Broccoli Fractal)
Ah, now this is one I can get behind! (I almost said "sink my teeth into," but that would have been too precious for words.)

Survey behind cut )
omorka: (Broccoli Fractal)
Ah, now this is one I can get behind! (I almost said "sink my teeth into," but that would have been too precious for words.)

Survey behind cut )
omorka: (Anime Jen)
One word, and one word only. No hyphenated cheats. One. WORD. ONLY.

You.
Can.
Only.
Type.
One.
Word.


Here )
omorka: (Anime Jen)
One word, and one word only. No hyphenated cheats. One. WORD. ONLY.

You.
Can.
Only.
Type.
One.
Word.


Here )

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