omorka: (Default)
Okay, so I had a transcendental moment at, of all things, a health food grocery store this evening.

I’ll put the story behind a cut because it’s kind of long, and if you follow me on Twitter you probably already read it. It involves Phil Collins and me unsuccessfully looking for barley flour.

Phonomancy from an odd place )
omorka: (Default)
Mythology )

---

Fanart & Fanmix feels )

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History )

Water. Trauma. Air. Memory. Tears in rain, courage in the flood.

Nammu, Tiamat, Enlil, Marduk. Powers that be, bless me, bless these my children, pass us by.
omorka: (Autoharp & Case)
New song I need to learn on autoharp: Toad the Wet Sprocket's "Walk On The Ocean."

I know the lyricist has said that the verses are loosely based on an actual vacation trip he'd taken to an island and that the chorus is just stream-of-consciousness nonsense riffing off the imagery in the first verse, but I'm pretty sure I can sing it in a manner that makes it clear that (in my reading, at least) it's absolutely about an encounter with the naiads, nereids, and dryads.

And I'm about 99% sure said encounter involved sex.
omorka: (Autoharp & Case)
So about a week ago I was browsing around on Tumblr and stumbled across an image of a pair of women in "medieval chic" early '70s fashions (several of the blogs that post Monkees stuff on Tumblr also branch out into other aspects of the pop culture of the time period). The clothes were not particularly interesting to me - I'm a Pagan; they sell dresses like that at every festival - but one of them had a peculiar thing on her lap. Two-thirds of it appeared to be an autoharp minus the chord bars (which I suppose would make it a manual-transmission harp); the last third had a fretboard down the side and five strings.

I may have said "What the crap is that?!" out loud.

It turns out it's a concert zither (or the one in the image might be its slightly larger brother the alpine zither), and it probably is either the direct ancestor of the autoharp or one step removed from said ancestor. It also turns out there was one on eBay for roughly $100 counting shipping. I may have made an impulsive decision.

She arrived today. She's at least sixty years old and not in the best condition - I suspect she's been in someone's attic for forty years or so, and was discovered in an estate sale or something like it. But all the frets and tuning pegs are there and seem solid enough. And even more than the two regular* autoharps (who have claimed the names of Ojo-sama and Ohime-sama, and no, I don't know why two American folk instruments based off of a German instrument wanted Japanese names, but there you go), this is clearly a feminine instrument.

She needs new strings, which it turned out even with shipping were easier to order from Germany than to buy here in the states. Cheshirebast is going to come over tomorrow and see if she's going to need any serious repairs before we re-string her. Part of my motivation was to get something that he would be nearly as clueless as I am on, so we could explore it together; I don't know how well that's going to work, but we'll see. The new strings and a "How To Play" book that I'm having to order through Amazon from Australia cost more than the instrument herself has.

So, yeah. I impulse-purchased a nearly-obsolete instrument and now I'm going to try to learn how to play it. Go me.


*As opposed to the restrung, re-barred, and amplified one we changed to play power chords, which delights in the title The Punk Autoharp and so far has not claimed another name.
omorka: (Weird In Concert)
So Adam Ant played at Warehouse Live last night. I'm not a huge fan, but I always liked his hits, and the Spouse was interested in seeing the show (and is more familiar with the back catalog), so we went.

Getting there was interesting; I think this is the first time we've tried to go to Warehouse Live when there's been a soccer game at the stadium, and not only was parking difficult, so was just driving around. At one point, we passed what used to be the Meridian, and its parking lot was full of food trucks. We ended up parking about three blocks away, but paying far more than we'd intended.

The opening band was a group called Prima Donna that I knew nothing about. They were a five-piece, with a drummer, a bassist who sang backup vocals on a couple of songs, a guitarist, a keyboard player who also played saxophone on the first song and did some backup vocals, and a lead singer who also played second/rhythm guitar on most of the songs. The first thing the singer said was a compliment on the local beer. They played what I described as a combination of roots rock and hair metal; I couldn't understand any of the lyrics, but they were more than competent and had the right vibe for the crowd.

Adam Ant's current backing band is a bassist, a guitarist, and two drummers, each with a full kit. Everyone in the band was tight and had great timing, but the drummers were especially impressive; at one point they did a nearly-two-minute-long accelerando in perfect synch without looking at each other. They also had very different styles - the male drummer was of the "I'm gonna beat the crap outta these drums" persuasion, while the female drummer was more of a "These drums will never know what hit them" type. It made for good stage presentation. I do wish they'd had a keyboardist with them, if only to fill in the horn parts on some of the songs - "Goody Two Shoes" sounds strange without it.

Adam himself started out looking stiff, as if his back were hurting him, and a little disconnected. However, somewhere halfway through the second song of the evening, he started flirting with the whole first row at once, and he took a moment to stretch during the intro to the next song, and after that everything was fine. His voice seemed to be just as good as it ever was, and while there wasn't a lot of stage banter, what there was was fun. I never quite shook the feeling that he needed an aspirin, but

I'm not a huge fan of Warehouse Live as a venue, because every time I go there some dudebro spills beer on me and half the time I get shoved or groped or both; the only time none of that has happened was during the Polyphonic Spree show, and that's largely because Tim DeLaughter is the best dang High Priest I've ever seen work - that show was church/ritual and the audience treated it as such. Also, the sound system isn't great and their in-house sound guy tends to mix very flat, which on that system tends to mean muddy. This was better than average for the venue, and I hate to say it, but I suspect it was because this is the first time I've seen the crowd there at gender parity - most of the shows we've seen have been sausagefests (the worst offender was the Devo show there, which I'd guess at about 75% male or more). The worst I had to deal with was three drunk dudebros who were clearly fans, and having a great time - but one of them felt like he had to explain what a great time he was having to his friends, rather than actually experiencing the show, and the friend he usually had to explain it to was built like a brick workshed, so they kept forming a wall that completely blocked my view. The shed also managed to spill beer on me, but not much.

Overall, good show, with some minor frustrations. Mostly nostalgia value for me, but obviously there were some far more passionate fans in the crowd.
omorka: (Monkees '68)
Not much to say for this one.

Reviews Behind The Cut )

One episode that would have been good if they'd actually finished the plot, one good-but-not-great one, and the holiday special, which suffers from an excess of schmaltz but still feels like a Monkees episode (and Mike's musings on love as the spirit of Christmas might foreshadow his later, better speech on the topic five episodes from now). The next one is a fan favorite and has commentary from Nesmith and Tork (I think it's Tork; it might be Jones again). Eleven episodes to go.
omorka: (Monkees '68)
"Goin' Down" is a really strange song. I mean, the first half is basically a first-person narration of a suicide attempt, and the second half, where the narrator has decided that's a bad idea, is either their hallucination when they finally have gone down for the last time, or the weirdest happy ending ever - Huck Finn without a raft, almost. And the song is really ambiguous about which it is. On top of that, you have Micky's rapid-fire, manic presentation, completely at odds with the lyrics.

It's a good song. I actually like it a lot. But it's strange, and probably would have sounded even stranger to a teenybopper audience at the time.

Let's see if I can get through three episodes tonight )

Okay, so two better-than-average episodes and one frantic, funky one that is at least partly new to me - and fabulous, if a bit sad in one spot for external reasons. This is Season Two as I remember it, and I think the next two episodes are about the same as this one (the one after that is the Christmas special, which is sort of its own thing). After that we get a run of five that I'm really looking forward to, ending with "The Devil And Peter Tork," which is widely considered the best episode of the whole run. Then there are four I remember being less than the top of their game, including a comedic drag ep, and then the last two, which are two more Fetish Fuel entries for me. I don't know if I'm going to bother with the post-show special, "33 1/3 Revolutions Per Monkee," as it's not part of the canon and it's generally considered to suck.

Oh, and Micky is wearing white Converse sneakers in some of these episodes. I can't see whether they're hightops or normal sneakers because the bellbottoms cover his ankles, but now I'm tempted to see if I can still get a matching pair. Maybe we'll get a better view of them in another episode; I know we get several shots of his feet in Episode 49, but I don't remember if he's wearing the same shoes or not.
omorka: (Monkees '68)
Haven't listened to the Plastic Symphony EP in ages (It's really two solo singles from 1965 that someone squished into an EP sometime in the CD era). Aw, Micky, honey, what are you doing? Poor thing sounds like he's scared to actually try to sing it straight, so he's doing his "goofy voices" thing instead. If this is what he sounded like before Boyce and Hart got hold of him, I understand now how the Missing Links could possibly fire one of the great pop voices. (And, because I don't have shuffle on at the moment, iTunes transitions into his cover of "Good Morning, Good Morning" from Remember, and oh, gods, if there were ever an argument for mature experience over youthful enthusiasm . . . .)

---

This is the final disc in the first season, and it's only two episodes long, one of which is the "concert video" episode. However, there are plenty of extras and three commentary tracks (all on that latter episode) to talk about, so here we go Behind The Cut )

One pretty good episode and one that's outside of continuity for my purposes. Overall, Season 1 had some surprisingly strong episodes, but only a handful I could point to and say they're among my favorites. I said before that I remember Season 2 being better; next time we'll see whether my memory betrayed me or not.
omorka: (Monkees '68)
This cover song (the one in the music tag) exists. To get an idea of the tone, imagine that someone has taken the original Archies song, and proceeded to stuff every drop of the attitude of Def Leppard's "Pour Some Sugar On Me" into it. I have never heard anyone make the word "dextrose" sound this dirty. *faints*

Another three episodes Behind The Cut )

One thin ep and two okay ones. Two more to go in the season, one of which is the concert footage episode.
omorka: (Monkees '68)
The sound on this video isn't great, especially with the whole freaking audience singing along, but damn, Dolenz sounds pretty good here. Still got pipes.

It's odd - here are these three guys and a ghost, touring 47 years after that song hit the airwaves for the first time. They're still around, and they still draw audiences - but they don't seem to take anything away from the hot, hip, young artists that get radio airplay now. There are radio stations that only air what's on the top 40 now, now, now, and there are radio stations that don't play any songs that couldn't drink, and everyone who makes it to the corporate level seems to make their dime all right, piracy be damned. So why is it that the movie and video game industries have so much trouble making money off of new stuff? Is it just the price of entry, that making a 3:30 pop song is that much cheaper than a 90-minute movie? I guess a 45" single or a song off of iTunes is an easier sell than an $8 movie ticket or a $60 video game - and hell, at least you get to keep the song and the video game; maybe I should be comparing the $20 DVD instead of the movie ticket. (And I suppose concert tickets are more expensive, and the experience just as ephemeral.) Still, the balance of old and new stuff for movies and video games seems off, compared to music.

Not that I mind. I'm spending my birthday check from my folks on a ticket to the Houston show (and probably some concert swag). I don't think they'll mind at all.

On the next-to-last disc now. Three more episodes Behind the Cut )

One problematic dud flanked by two pretty decent episodes with some character development. We've got five more episodes to go in the season.
omorka: (Monkees '68)
So, I mentioned "Different Drum" yesterday. Given that the version of that song that hit the Top 20 and became famous was the 1967 one with Linda Ronstadt, does that make it yet another half-Monkee, half-(Stone) Poney monster? (Holy Extra E's, Batman!)

Enough of that. On to the next three episodes Behind The Cut )

One real clunker and two good episodes, both of which have extra flavor for me personally for various impure reasons. I feel like the season has finally really gotten going. We've also been out of the Pad for all three, although I think that changes next episode.
omorka: (Monkees '68)
This song has two versions. They have completely different arrangements. The backing vocals are completely different. The one I knew from the '80s revival has Mike singing, backed by either Micky or Boyce (I genuinely can't tell; I'm going to assume it's Micky). I just found out about this one this week. This one has Peter singing - Peter! - backed by Davy (and probably Mike, and maybe Micky mixed way in the back; it's hard to hear because this mix is made of mud).

The one that ended up on the show, with Mike singing lead, is by far the better version; the arrangement is much crisper and fuller. I suspect that this other one was a demo, someone trying Peter out just to see if he could do it; Peter's not a bad vocalist, but he's got a limited range, and this song pushes it. Put him up against Mike and Davy's impressive projection and it's easy to decide to put him in the backing track, holding a few notes. Put him against Micky and - ah, no. You can't. It's just not fair. Mike's got an authentic, rough-hewn sound, but he's got power behind it (and a Texas lilt); Davy's got precision and polish (and a Manchester accent); Micky's got pipes like an organ. How could Peter's merely decent voice stand up against that?

One of the reasons I think this is either a demo or an early take is that Peter makes several audible errors, and his phrasing sounds like he just got handed the sheet music an hour ago. Mike's version swings more. If I had to choose, as presumably someone (Kirshner? Rafaelson?) did, which one of these to polish in the studio and send out into the world, I'd've made the same choice they did (well, no, let's be honest, I'd have cut a version with Micky double-tracked against himself or with Davy backing and weighed that against the Mike version).

But - here this one is, having survived somehow. Here's Peter's naive vocal, mixed against Davy trying to make him look good, and that muddy mess in the back that's Mike (I'm pretty sure I can hear him specifically on at least one chorus) and maybe Micky, too, trying not to show off. Here's this much simpler hook, this more loping tempo. Here's what may be one of the few non-live versions of a Monkees track prior to Headquarters with all four of them present on the track. Here's poor Peter, the only one who isn't just playing a greatly simplified caricature of himself in the show, telling his audience: I'm not the person you have this image of in your head. I'm not just doing this for the money.

This is - I can't say "this is precious," because that phrase has taken on sarcastic baggage that this doesn't deserve. But it's the only word I can come up with. This is something rare, and maybe a little fragile, something that was discarded and got cruft on it and someone tried to make it right again because they saw the value in it. Here's Peter, singing lead for the first time, and it's not the ferocious, almost angry thing Mike made of it, or the dismissive, laughing thing Davy would have made of it, or the sharp-edged and glittering thing Micky would have made of it. It's vulnerable and a little breaky around the edges, and it makes me want to cry in a way that the commercial release doesn't.

Having heard it now, I am immensely glad this version survived.

On to three more shows Behind The Cut )
omorka: (Autoharp & Case)
Apparently I only like Christmas carols when they're in another language, preferably one I don't speak. "Gaudete," "Patapan," "Un Flambeau," "Stille Nacht" (but don't even try it in English!), and now "Riu Chiu."

Of course, who's singing it doesn't hurt. I've pointed out before that I really, really like how Micky Dolenz's and Mike Nesmith's voices sound together, and I don't think it's just the ear of puberty, there. A cappella Monkees, four voices, no instruments? Yes, please!

Apparently Micky ended up on several celebrity atheist lists after answering "No," to the Onion A.V. club's interviewer's question of "Is there a God?" They appear to have left out the remainder of the answer - "God is a verb, not a noun." That doesn't make him an atheist; it makes him a process theologian (and probably either a humanist or a newager or both). It also makes him the sort of guy who quotes Buckminster Fuller to impress girls, or at least interviewers.

Not that there's anything wrong with that. There's a small number of guys who were already in their 40s when I went through puberty who were nonetheless crush-objects of mine and whom I would still quite happily bed now, with me approaching 40 myself and them another twenty years or more along ahead of me, should I get the chance. Harold Ramis tops the list, of course, but Micky Dolenz is quite firmly in second place. (That I was crushing on his twentysomething self from the '60s when he was fortysomething in the '80s is an interesting bit of timey-wimey complexity, but life and teenage hormones are like that sometimes.)

He's still got pipes, as does Nesmith. Shame they can't get along, really. With Jones gone (alas! and RIP), there's little hope of the Monkees ever really being more than three brothers in a deep-seated sibling rivalry sharing a stage for a few minutes. Tork's even harder to wrangle than Nesmith is, although he tends to need the money more. Davy was the only one who still got along with the others, and even that not always well. Still, they did manage to share a stage once in a while, in threes or occasionally fours; not all bands from the same time with acrimonious breakups could say the same.

---

Can we keep Matt Smith for another season of Doctor Who and get rid of Moffatt instead? No? Just a thought.
omorka: (Winston Zeddemore (RGB))
So last Movie Night we ended watching a 50-minute documentary on sampling. Afterwards, [livejournal.com profile] bassfingers pointed us to this 20-minute documentary on the "Amen Break," the six-second drum break from the Winstons' 1969 b-side "Amen Brother" - which has been sampled and modded into ubiquity for decades. (The documentary noted that something similar has happened to James Brown's "Funky Drummer." And the two drummers involved - Gregory Coleman and Clyde Stubblefield, respectively - never got a dime from any of it, beyond what they got from the original recording.)

Apparently it Amen Breaks when it is Amen Breaking time. The Slacktivist cited it today as part of a metaphor about momentary toss-off inspirations causing larger changes down the road (a bit Butterfly Effect, a bit mindfulness meditation).

Third?
omorka: (Jigglypuff Demands)
I don't know if I'm irked at myself for ripping this in the first place, or weirded out that CTW thought this filk was a good idea, but I am definitely WTFing at this song having a banjo as its lead instrument.
omorka: (Peter Possessed)
I forget whether it was Romeo or Juliet who made the comment about "my only love sprung from my only hate," but I now know what they were talking about: IDW will be publishing a Mars Attacks/Real Ghostbusters crossover in January.

I'm not sure if I can accurately describe how conflicted I am. On the one hand, I desperately want to support any return of RGB to the comics medium. On the other hand, I really, really, really despise Mars Attacks on every possible level.

---

In other news, if you haven't heard the mashup in the music bar for this post, hit it up on YouTube. It's both funny and quite well-put-together. And just in time for Halloween!
omorka: (Weird In Concert)
So, Thomas Dolby is starting his Time Capsule tour tomorrow, at SXSW. For some reason, he was going to be in Houston today, and he needed a rehearsal space for their last dress rehearsal. Through a series of events involving a local radio station and possibly a time machine (not sure about that part), that final dress rehearsal turned into a no-cover show at Stereo Live (which is the most recent incarnation of one of the perennial clubs on Richmond). So of course the entire social group turned out.

The Spouse and I got there first, and were in the first 20 or so people into the club. Rather than trying to stake out space right in front of the stage, where we would be looking up, we claimed a booth with comfy seats at the back of the room - elevated, so we could see the band over the heads of the floor crowd.

The opening band was an all-male four-piece from Sugar Land, and they were derivative, but I like the bands they were derivative of (in particular, I suspect the songwriter has listened to a lot of BoDeans and Tom Petty), so it was reasonably enjoyable. And they seemed pretty enthusiastic about being there. Need to work on their stage banter, though.

Dolby was awesome, as he always is, and he seemed more comfortable being onstage with a guitarist and drummer instead of all by himself - he was much chattier and more relaxed than the last show we saw, on the Sole Inhabitant tour. The Spouse will probably post the setlist, if anyone's curious. He opened with "Commercial Breakup," which I was not expecting to hear. I think I was a few bars into the song before I realized I was using the booth railing as a crash bar; I did a lot more physical flailing (and a lot less handwork) dancing than I normally do, hanging onto the thing for support. My knees are gonna kill me tomorrow, but I don't really care.

Somewhere around "Airhead," some redhead high-fived me; the Spouse told me later that was Donna MacKenzie, local DJ extraordinaire. And some dude was taking pictures of the whole booth jumping up and down and sideways during "Hyperactive." There weren't that many other people dancing, even though Dolby chastised the crowd "If you can't dance to this, you're dead" during "Blinded Me With Science," which of course was the set closer, although they did come on for one encore - and brought a belly dancer onstage, possibly to make up for the rest of the audience. (I kind of wanted to steal her outfit; she wasn't that much smaller than me.)

He didn't do "Radio Silence," "Windpower," or "That's Why People Fall In Love," which are my three favorites of his, but he did do "One of Our Submarines," "I Love You Goodbye," and "Europa And the Pirate Twins," in addition to the above-mentioned songs, so I can't complain. It was a damn good 105-minute show, especially for something short-planned and free (except for parking).

Let's hope he schedules a show here on the next tour . . .
omorka: (Weird In Concert)
So, Thomas Dolby is starting his Time Capsule tour tomorrow, at SXSW. For some reason, he was going to be in Houston today, and he needed a rehearsal space for their last dress rehearsal. Through a series of events involving a local radio station and possibly a time machine (not sure about that part), that final dress rehearsal turned into a no-cover show at Stereo Live (which is the most recent incarnation of one of the perennial clubs on Richmond). So of course the entire social group turned out.

The Spouse and I got there first, and were in the first 20 or so people into the club. Rather than trying to stake out space right in front of the stage, where we would be looking up, we claimed a booth with comfy seats at the back of the room - elevated, so we could see the band over the heads of the floor crowd.

The opening band was an all-male four-piece from Sugar Land, and they were derivative, but I like the bands they were derivative of (in particular, I suspect the songwriter has listened to a lot of BoDeans and Tom Petty), so it was reasonably enjoyable. And they seemed pretty enthusiastic about being there. Need to work on their stage banter, though.

Dolby was awesome, as he always is, and he seemed more comfortable being onstage with a guitarist and drummer instead of all by himself - he was much chattier and more relaxed than the last show we saw, on the Sole Inhabitant tour. The Spouse will probably post the setlist, if anyone's curious. He opened with "Commercial Breakup," which I was not expecting to hear. I think I was a few bars into the song before I realized I was using the booth railing as a crash bar; I did a lot more physical flailing (and a lot less handwork) dancing than I normally do, hanging onto the thing for support. My knees are gonna kill me tomorrow, but I don't really care.

Somewhere around "Airhead," some redhead high-fived me; the Spouse told me later that was Donna MacKenzie, local DJ extraordinaire. And some dude was taking pictures of the whole booth jumping up and down and sideways during "Hyperactive." There weren't that many other people dancing, even though Dolby chastised the crowd "If you can't dance to this, you're dead" during "Blinded Me With Science," which of course was the set closer, although they did come on for one encore - and brought a belly dancer onstage, possibly to make up for the rest of the audience. (I kind of wanted to steal her outfit; she wasn't that much smaller than me.)

He didn't do "Radio Silence," "Windpower," or "That's Why People Fall In Love," which are my three favorites of his, but he did do "One of Our Submarines," "I Love You Goodbye," and "Europa And the Pirate Twins," in addition to the above-mentioned songs, so I can't complain. It was a damn good 105-minute show, especially for something short-planned and free (except for parking).

Let's hope he schedules a show here on the next tour . . .
omorka: (Default)
For those who don't know, the Monkees - specifically, the TV show - was one of my early fandoms. I used to have an old notebook from 7th and 8th grade - horrible years, those - filled with snippets of bad fanfic for it. (I will point out that, rather than having my self-insert show up with her naturally curly raven tresses and jade green eyes and have each of the boys fall for her in turn, she was part of her own four-piece band that had a love-hate-rivalry with them and thrashed them at battles-of-the-bands. Not that that's, you know, that much better.)

A Beatle has been gone for pretty much all of my sentient life, the Stones are still around, and I wasn't introduced to the Who until much later, so the Monkees were my "ooh, if only they could get back together!" band. The lack of Nesmith notwithstanding, their '80s reunion album had some fine pop on it. It's a crying shame that they can't get along for long - and Davy was the one who seemed to get along best with the rest.

You were never my crush (Dolenz is the one I will weep bitter tears for), but for your voice and your essential part in something that made my middle school years two decades later bearable, I toast you. Ave et Vale, Davy Jones!

You've seen "Daydream Believer" 20,000 times today, so have one of his that I like better (not just because it's early American electronica, although that is also true): "Star Collector." (These guys were masters of Getting Crap Past The Radar.)



(And one last bit of snark: does this mean David Bowie can go back to using his real name?)
omorka: (Default)
For those who don't know, the Monkees - specifically, the TV show - was one of my early fandoms. I used to have an old notebook from 7th and 8th grade - horrible years, those - filled with snippets of bad fanfic for it. (I will point out that, rather than having my self-insert show up with her naturally curly raven tresses and jade green eyes and have each of the boys fall for her in turn, she was part of her own four-piece band that had a love-hate-rivalry with them and thrashed them at battles-of-the-bands. Not that that's, you know, that much better.)

A Beatle has been gone for pretty much all of my sentient life, the Stones are still around, and I wasn't introduced to the Who until much later, so the Monkees were my "ooh, if only they could get back together!" band. The lack of Nesmith notwithstanding, their '80s reunion album had some fine pop on it. It's a crying shame that they can't get along for long - and Davy was the one who seemed to get along best with the rest.

You were never my crush (Dolenz is the one I will weep bitter tears for), but for your voice and your essential part in something that made my middle school years two decades later bearable, I toast you. Ave et Vale, Davy Jones!

You've seen "Daydream Believer" 20,000 times today, so have one of his that I like better (not just because it's early American electronica, although that is also true): "Star Collector." (These guys were masters of Getting Crap Past The Radar.)



(And one last bit of snark: does this mean David Bowie can go back to using his real name?)

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