omorka: (Winston Zeddemore (RGB))
So last Movie Night we ended watching a 50-minute documentary on sampling. Afterwards, [livejournal.com profile] bassfingers pointed us to this 20-minute documentary on the "Amen Break," the six-second drum break from the Winstons' 1969 b-side "Amen Brother" - which has been sampled and modded into ubiquity for decades. (The documentary noted that something similar has happened to James Brown's "Funky Drummer." And the two drummers involved - Gregory Coleman and Clyde Stubblefield, respectively - never got a dime from any of it, beyond what they got from the original recording.)

Apparently it Amen Breaks when it is Amen Breaking time. The Slacktivist cited it today as part of a metaphor about momentary toss-off inspirations causing larger changes down the road (a bit Butterfly Effect, a bit mindfulness meditation).

Third?
omorka: (Anime Jen)
We ended up watching The Men Who Stare At Goats for Movie Night. I enjoyed the acting immensely, and was tickled by various shout-outs to bits of NewAge and fringe culture (especially the book on psychic research in the Soviet Union - the public library where I grew up had a copy of that same printing in its teeny, tiny occult section), but I find myself vaguely unsatisfied with the actual plot of the thing. No specific criticisms, except for uneven pacing, but - I feel like I ate a giant omelet and am still hungry. I'm also weirded out by how badly the film fails the Bechdel Test - there's only one named female character, and we really only ever hear her speak over the phone. Then again, it is about the military.

I kind of like the morning salutation to Mother Earth, though. (Does she count as a female character? Does the Kwan Yin-vision?) And the bit at the end of the credits giving me permission to be invisible was just - gee, thanks, guys. :-/
omorka: (Anime Jen)
We ended up watching The Men Who Stare At Goats for Movie Night. I enjoyed the acting immensely, and was tickled by various shout-outs to bits of NewAge and fringe culture (especially the book on psychic research in the Soviet Union - the public library where I grew up had a copy of that same printing in its teeny, tiny occult section), but I find myself vaguely unsatisfied with the actual plot of the thing. No specific criticisms, except for uneven pacing, but - I feel like I ate a giant omelet and am still hungry. I'm also weirded out by how badly the film fails the Bechdel Test - there's only one named female character, and we really only ever hear her speak over the phone. Then again, it is about the military.

I kind of like the morning salutation to Mother Earth, though. (Does she count as a female character? Does the Kwan Yin-vision?) And the bit at the end of the credits giving me permission to be invisible was just - gee, thanks, guys. :-/
omorka: (Wizard of Speed and Time)
Finally got to watch Pirate Radio, aka The Boat That Rocked.

Chris O'Dowd needs more roles, stat. Also, Nick Frost? I'd hit it.
omorka: (Wizard of Speed and Time)
Finally got to watch Pirate Radio, aka The Boat That Rocked.

Chris O'Dowd needs more roles, stat. Also, Nick Frost? I'd hit it.
omorka: (These Are The Voyages)
Since the 40th Glorious 20th was a few days ago, the Spouse showed For All Mankind. Despite being a total sausage-fest, it's a really moving film, especially when the astronauts start talking about the emotional impact of seeing the Earth from lunar orbit, and their feelings on leaving the Moon.

It starts with JFK's address from Rice Stadium, which is fun, partly because all the politicans from Up North are sweating like pigs in the Houston heat and about to fall out; only LBJ isn't melting, and he doesn't exactly look comfortable, but at least he knew better than to wear a regular wool suit. But the idea that the government can and should take on difficult tasks because they are difficult is an interesting one, and one that fell out of favor sometime in the '70s. I hope the current Civic generation comes around to that again.
omorka: (These Are The Voyages)
Since the 40th Glorious 20th was a few days ago, the Spouse showed For All Mankind. Despite being a total sausage-fest, it's a really moving film, especially when the astronauts start talking about the emotional impact of seeing the Earth from lunar orbit, and their feelings on leaving the Moon.

It starts with JFK's address from Rice Stadium, which is fun, partly because all the politicans from Up North are sweating like pigs in the Houston heat and about to fall out; only LBJ isn't melting, and he doesn't exactly look comfortable, but at least he knew better than to wear a regular wool suit. But the idea that the government can and should take on difficult tasks because they are difficult is an interesting one, and one that fell out of favor sometime in the '70s. I hope the current Civic generation comes around to that again.
omorka: (Anime Jen)
Went to the Evangelion 1.0 reboot movie with the Spouse for Movie Night. The theater said they'd sold out, but there was an empty seat next to me the whole movie, and it wasn't the only one, so I don't know what was up. I'm not the hugest Eva fan, but I found it enjoyable. The new voice casting of Kaworu is squee-inducing. I spent the whole thing trying to figure out who Kensuke was in Neon Revelation Phantasmion, and am currently hypothesizing that he's Louis. Tiffany Grant was there, and was called out by our host; she pointed out that she was "Sir Not-appearing-in-this-film," as we haven't met Asuka by the end of the movie.

The Alamo was much better than last time, food-wise, meaning both that the food was more edible and that the service was more prompt. It's still too far to go for me to want to see anything there on a regular basis, but I'm much happier than I was the last two times.
omorka: (Anime Jen)
Went to the Evangelion 1.0 reboot movie with the Spouse for Movie Night. The theater said they'd sold out, but there was an empty seat next to me the whole movie, and it wasn't the only one, so I don't know what was up. I'm not the hugest Eva fan, but I found it enjoyable. The new voice casting of Kaworu is squee-inducing. I spent the whole thing trying to figure out who Kensuke was in Neon Revelation Phantasmion, and am currently hypothesizing that he's Louis. Tiffany Grant was there, and was called out by our host; she pointed out that she was "Sir Not-appearing-in-this-film," as we haven't met Asuka by the end of the movie.

The Alamo was much better than last time, food-wise, meaning both that the food was more edible and that the service was more prompt. It's still too far to go for me to want to see anything there on a regular basis, but I'm much happier than I was the last two times.
omorka: (Wizard of Speed and Time)
We ended up watching Eagle Eye, which was a disposable popcorn action flick, on Thursday. I enjoyed it, in a superficial sort of way, largely because I like Rosario Dawson as an actress and Billy Bob Thornton did a good job with the bully-on-our-side character. (And I have an odd fascination with Shia LaBeouf. I keep thinking someone cloned John Cusack and replaced his clever wordplay and comic timing with better physical reflexes. (Poor trade, IMHO.) Their voices are even pretty close.)

As a plot, it was entirely recycled - three parts WarGames, two parts Portal, and one part 2001. Nothing wrong with it, but nothing original in it, either. I did have two questions, though:

Cut for potential spoilers )
omorka: (Wizard of Speed and Time)
We ended up watching Eagle Eye, which was a disposable popcorn action flick, on Thursday. I enjoyed it, in a superficial sort of way, largely because I like Rosario Dawson as an actress and Billy Bob Thornton did a good job with the bully-on-our-side character. (And I have an odd fascination with Shia LaBeouf. I keep thinking someone cloned John Cusack and replaced his clever wordplay and comic timing with better physical reflexes. (Poor trade, IMHO.) Their voices are even pretty close.)

As a plot, it was entirely recycled - three parts WarGames, two parts Portal, and one part 2001. Nothing wrong with it, but nothing original in it, either. I did have two questions, though:

Cut for potential spoilers )
omorka: (Wizard of Speed and Time)
. . . Well, stole the art off of a Jittlov fansite, changed the background, and saved it as a JPEG. But anyway.

So, yeah, we did The Wizard of Speed and Time for Movie Night. It's part of the in-language of this particular social group, [livejournal.com profile] northwall hadn't seen it yet and she'll be out of town for Movie Nights after this week, and the Spouse kind of needed something that was full of hope, humor, and optimism. (I had jokingly suggested Fog of War previously, which didn't so much go over well.) It's a bit dated - in particular, the politics of the film come across as oddly pro-corporate for a story about a guy trying to work outside of the corporate structure, in that the mild spoiler if you haven't seen the film ), but I suspect that's largely because the film is really anti-bureaucracy in any form, and the government just comes in for comparatively more bashing than the corporate world. I'm a little surprised that the Libertarians haven't seized on the film as a favorite, honestly - it's not explicitly Libertarian, of course (else I wouldn't love it so), but its ethics are superficially aligned, at least. Similarly, the film is full of the most egregious ethnic stereotypes ever, but it is clearly fully aware that it is using them, and is doing so ironically. (For example, along with a stereotypical East-LA Hispanic gang member, we are introduced to another illegal immigrant - who says "eh" every third word.)

Then there's the line "I wonder how many other people are out there? Writing stories and scripts that nobody else may ever read, making movies that nobody may ever see... discovering secrets, important things that could help everybody." Well, now we all can see their stories on LiveJournal, their scripts on their blogs, and their movies on You Tube, and honestly, most of them aren't all that interesting. Still, it is enlightening to find those odd gems of humor or erotica (rarely drama or tragedy, but I suppose we have real life for that) out of other people's experiences and lives, made by amateurs or low-level professionals and set free into the datastream. Sturgeon's Law applies, as it does to anything, and that other 10% is often worth the search.

And the available version of the film is more or less incomplete; Jittlov has pointed out that he considers it a work print. For all that it's a flawed work, though, its heart is consistently in the right place.
omorka: (Wizard of Speed and Time)
. . . Well, stole the art off of a Jittlov fansite, changed the background, and saved it as a JPEG. But anyway.

So, yeah, we did The Wizard of Speed and Time for Movie Night. It's part of the in-language of this particular social group, [livejournal.com profile] northwall hadn't seen it yet and she'll be out of town for Movie Nights after this week, and the Spouse kind of needed something that was full of hope, humor, and optimism. (I had jokingly suggested Fog of War previously, which didn't so much go over well.) It's a bit dated - in particular, the politics of the film come across as oddly pro-corporate for a story about a guy trying to work outside of the corporate structure, in that the mild spoiler if you haven't seen the film ), but I suspect that's largely because the film is really anti-bureaucracy in any form, and the government just comes in for comparatively more bashing than the corporate world. I'm a little surprised that the Libertarians haven't seized on the film as a favorite, honestly - it's not explicitly Libertarian, of course (else I wouldn't love it so), but its ethics are superficially aligned, at least. Similarly, the film is full of the most egregious ethnic stereotypes ever, but it is clearly fully aware that it is using them, and is doing so ironically. (For example, along with a stereotypical East-LA Hispanic gang member, we are introduced to another illegal immigrant - who says "eh" every third word.)

Then there's the line "I wonder how many other people are out there? Writing stories and scripts that nobody else may ever read, making movies that nobody may ever see... discovering secrets, important things that could help everybody." Well, now we all can see their stories on LiveJournal, their scripts on their blogs, and their movies on You Tube, and honestly, most of them aren't all that interesting. Still, it is enlightening to find those odd gems of humor or erotica (rarely drama or tragedy, but I suppose we have real life for that) out of other people's experiences and lives, made by amateurs or low-level professionals and set free into the datastream. Sturgeon's Law applies, as it does to anything, and that other 10% is often worth the search.

And the available version of the film is more or less incomplete; Jittlov has pointed out that he considers it a work print. For all that it's a flawed work, though, its heart is consistently in the right place.
omorka: (Weird In Concert)
Yeah, so we finally watched Walk The Line at Movie Night last night, and what happens?

I spend the better part of an hour poking around online to see how much a used/refurbished autoharp would cost.

*forehead smack*

The terrible thing is, even most of a day later, I can't convice myself that it would be a really bad idea. The most I can get to is "that'd be expensive." Which is annoying, but surmountable.

[Edited for spelling fail]
omorka: (Weird In Concert)
Yeah, so we finally watched Walk The Line at Movie Night last night, and what happens?

I spend the better part of an hour poking around online to see how much a used/refurbished autoharp would cost.

*forehead smack*

The terrible thing is, even most of a day later, I can't convice myself that it would be a really bad idea. The most I can get to is "that'd be expensive." Which is annoying, but surmountable.

[Edited for spelling fail]
omorka: (Zaftig-formal)
DM showed up at Movie Night! Yay! He brought the Spouse a cute-but-a-bit-disturbing poster, which I hope Spouse will say something about in his own journal.

We ended up doing random bits and pieces of anime, trying to get DM and [livejournal.com profile] wren_chan caught up on a few things, rather than an actual movie. I think PB was a bit bored; I tried to make it up to him by actually baking this time. It was just the one-dish brownies, but that seems to go over well enough with this crowd.

I think I'm going to make excuses to Mom and stay here for Thanksgiving week. I don't feel like leaving the relative safety of the big city in the current political climate, especially since I'd be expected to make nice with my aunt and uncle, the biggest Republican boosters in northeast Mississippi. So who wants to do another Orphan's Dinner?
omorka: (Zaftig-formal)
DM showed up at Movie Night! Yay! He brought the Spouse a cute-but-a-bit-disturbing poster, which I hope Spouse will say something about in his own journal.

We ended up doing random bits and pieces of anime, trying to get DM and [livejournal.com profile] wren_chan caught up on a few things, rather than an actual movie. I think PB was a bit bored; I tried to make it up to him by actually baking this time. It was just the one-dish brownies, but that seems to go over well enough with this crowd.

I think I'm going to make excuses to Mom and stay here for Thanksgiving week. I don't feel like leaving the relative safety of the big city in the current political climate, especially since I'd be expected to make nice with my aunt and uncle, the biggest Republican boosters in northeast Mississippi. So who wants to do another Orphan's Dinner?
omorka: (Default)
Well, this has been an exciting and informational week. And interesting, did I mention interesting? In the Chinese curse sense of "interesting"?

Managed to make it through the AP Stats Institute without embarrassing myself too badly. On Thursday, I ended up arguing against the rest of the class on one problem, but not on the math - they had chosen to block certain items together in a problem based on the environment, and I wanted to argue for morning vs. afternoon sunlight as more important than proximity to a door, which was what they wanted to use. The master teacher said that the proximity blocking was what the scoring rubric had used, but that if I had given my blocking and clearly given my argument for it, I would have gotten full credit for it. Two old guys in the back still didn't believe me about the sunlight, though.

RS was late every single day, but then she had to drive in from way out on the other side of Fort Bend every morning. (She also spilled a lot of coffee, but fortunately not on me.) There was a coach in the class (not the guy we were tripled with, although he was also a coach) who WOULD NOT SHUT UP, kept pointing out the BLINDINGLY OBVIOUS, and argued exclusively out of the book. (This is one of my educational issues with Christian fundamentalism. It encourages the fallacy of the appeal to printed authority.) On the other hand, one of the cleverest people in the course (who wore a lot of purple and green, too) turned out to be a gamer and a friend of CF's. He's publishing a game this fall; I'll have to e-mail him about it later and see when he's demoing it in this area. In addition, he went through RUSMP this summer, so hopefully I'll bump into him in that math ed subcommunity, too.

Bussed to the downtown convention center for CAMT from Rice at about noon on Friday. The Friday afternoon sessions were better, I think, than the Saturday sessions; several of the morning sessions I had wanted to go to were cancelled. On the other hand, one of the replacement sessions was Dr. L, and she seemed pleased enough to see me - and even more pleased to hear that I got AP Stats this year. (I mentioned before that Mr. B has gone to bat for me because he thinks he made a good decision hiring me; Dr. L has the same investment in me, since she found me in the first place and wrote the recommendation that got me cinched, and she doesn't have nearly as much riding on it as she's retired from the district now, so she rather enjoys bragging on me in my hearing.) Another teacher in that same workshop, who has done Carnegie training with her, is apparently one of Ms. H.R.'s new hires for our department. I hope that doesn't mean someone else quit . . .

I did learn some useful stuff about TAKS from the TEA assessment people, and I liked the sessions I did go to; I just wish not as much had been cancelled. Oh, and I had to snarl when I notices that the Sassenach had a table in the dealer's room. Really, why do they come to these things? Don't they know that the entire philosophical foundations of this conference are virulently opposed to them and all they stand for? Why should they even show up? I mean, I have some philosophical differences with the mainstream of NCTM/TCTM, but they're reconcilable - I am concerned with the gifted as the gifted, while they are concerned with the "average" student. We both want excellence to the best of their abilities from both sets of students; we differ in how much we think the special populations need in terms of extra support beyond standard classroom differentiation to reach that excellence. The Sassenach, on the other hand, have an entirely different philosophy about the learning of mathematics (for those who are not familiar with the people I'm talking about, they're a textbook publisher and they believe that computational competence (a) should proceed conceptual understanding and (b) will invariably lead to conceptual understanding on its own). I understand why they sell so well to the homeschooler crowd, but surely in an NCTM-dominated conference, they'll sell very little.


Movie Night was crowded this week - PB brought his little nephew (I wish he'd warned us ahead of time), DM and DG both showed up, and then AH and someone I don't know named M both followed DM. We ended up watching The Animatrix, which ranged from pretty good to downright silly. After the movie, we did some extra random anime (after PB, EW, and the annoying M left), which was mostly enjoyable; since PB had left and DG was still here, we watched it all subbed, which suited me fine. We also discussed the Galveston trip, which we have set a date of August 2 for. That puts it under a crescent moon, which will be fine for what I want to do. (DM and AH both made jokes about seeing them in bathing suits, which I found vaguely amusing, but I reassured them both that the primary point of the outing was in fact the aquarium at Moody Gardens, and the beach would be after dark.)


My personal favorite exchange of the evening:

DG (about the Utena movie): No! It's not even pretty! It just sucks!

Me: Well, I thought it was pretty, but I wasn't getting it, and I wasn't getting it, and I wasn't getting it, and then she turned into a car.

AH: That may be the best summary of that movie I've ever heard.

(DM falls over laughing.)



Hopefully, I'll actually get to bake for these next two Movie Nights, at least. Actually, the next three should be okay; after that, if I want to really bake and not just throw something together, I'll have to do it the night before. Still, that's doable, too, especially since I have a Bundt pan now and pound cakes don't go stale overnight, even if they're not frosted.
omorka: (Default)
Well, this has been an exciting and informational week. And interesting, did I mention interesting? In the Chinese curse sense of "interesting"?

Managed to make it through the AP Stats Institute without embarrassing myself too badly. On Thursday, I ended up arguing against the rest of the class on one problem, but not on the math - they had chosen to block certain items together in a problem based on the environment, and I wanted to argue for morning vs. afternoon sunlight as more important than proximity to a door, which was what they wanted to use. The master teacher said that the proximity blocking was what the scoring rubric had used, but that if I had given my blocking and clearly given my argument for it, I would have gotten full credit for it. Two old guys in the back still didn't believe me about the sunlight, though.

RS was late every single day, but then she had to drive in from way out on the other side of Fort Bend every morning. (She also spilled a lot of coffee, but fortunately not on me.) There was a coach in the class (not the guy we were tripled with, although he was also a coach) who WOULD NOT SHUT UP, kept pointing out the BLINDINGLY OBVIOUS, and argued exclusively out of the book. (This is one of my educational issues with Christian fundamentalism. It encourages the fallacy of the appeal to printed authority.) On the other hand, one of the cleverest people in the course (who wore a lot of purple and green, too) turned out to be a gamer and a friend of CF's. He's publishing a game this fall; I'll have to e-mail him about it later and see when he's demoing it in this area. In addition, he went through RUSMP this summer, so hopefully I'll bump into him in that math ed subcommunity, too.

Bussed to the downtown convention center for CAMT from Rice at about noon on Friday. The Friday afternoon sessions were better, I think, than the Saturday sessions; several of the morning sessions I had wanted to go to were cancelled. On the other hand, one of the replacement sessions was Dr. L, and she seemed pleased enough to see me - and even more pleased to hear that I got AP Stats this year. (I mentioned before that Mr. B has gone to bat for me because he thinks he made a good decision hiring me; Dr. L has the same investment in me, since she found me in the first place and wrote the recommendation that got me cinched, and she doesn't have nearly as much riding on it as she's retired from the district now, so she rather enjoys bragging on me in my hearing.) Another teacher in that same workshop, who has done Carnegie training with her, is apparently one of Ms. H.R.'s new hires for our department. I hope that doesn't mean someone else quit . . .

I did learn some useful stuff about TAKS from the TEA assessment people, and I liked the sessions I did go to; I just wish not as much had been cancelled. Oh, and I had to snarl when I notices that the Sassenach had a table in the dealer's room. Really, why do they come to these things? Don't they know that the entire philosophical foundations of this conference are virulently opposed to them and all they stand for? Why should they even show up? I mean, I have some philosophical differences with the mainstream of NCTM/TCTM, but they're reconcilable - I am concerned with the gifted as the gifted, while they are concerned with the "average" student. We both want excellence to the best of their abilities from both sets of students; we differ in how much we think the special populations need in terms of extra support beyond standard classroom differentiation to reach that excellence. The Sassenach, on the other hand, have an entirely different philosophy about the learning of mathematics (for those who are not familiar with the people I'm talking about, they're a textbook publisher and they believe that computational competence (a) should proceed conceptual understanding and (b) will invariably lead to conceptual understanding on its own). I understand why they sell so well to the homeschooler crowd, but surely in an NCTM-dominated conference, they'll sell very little.


Movie Night was crowded this week - PB brought his little nephew (I wish he'd warned us ahead of time), DM and DG both showed up, and then AH and someone I don't know named M both followed DM. We ended up watching The Animatrix, which ranged from pretty good to downright silly. After the movie, we did some extra random anime (after PB, EW, and the annoying M left), which was mostly enjoyable; since PB had left and DG was still here, we watched it all subbed, which suited me fine. We also discussed the Galveston trip, which we have set a date of August 2 for. That puts it under a crescent moon, which will be fine for what I want to do. (DM and AH both made jokes about seeing them in bathing suits, which I found vaguely amusing, but I reassured them both that the primary point of the outing was in fact the aquarium at Moody Gardens, and the beach would be after dark.)


My personal favorite exchange of the evening:

DG (about the Utena movie): No! It's not even pretty! It just sucks!

Me: Well, I thought it was pretty, but I wasn't getting it, and I wasn't getting it, and I wasn't getting it, and then she turned into a car.

AH: That may be the best summary of that movie I've ever heard.

(DM falls over laughing.)



Hopefully, I'll actually get to bake for these next two Movie Nights, at least. Actually, the next three should be okay; after that, if I want to really bake and not just throw something together, I'll have to do it the night before. Still, that's doable, too, especially since I have a Bundt pan now and pound cakes don't go stale overnight, even if they're not frosted.
omorka: (Default)
Movie Night tonight was me, the Spouse, EW and the annoying M, DG, and a very late PB. DM and AH ditched on us (at least DM called to let us know he was ditching; heard nothing from AH at all). I'm not entirely clear whether he understands exactly how much he's jerking me around doing this; if he does, I'm displeased, and I'd like to know whether it's deliberate, and if not, he's displaying a somewhat irritating amount of flakitude.

I baked a batch of double-cocoa Cocoa Pinks for Movie Night. Those went over well. If DM calls tomorrow, I'll taunt him with having missed chocolate; that should show him up well enough, ne? (Of course, I saved some for him. What do I look like, a sadist?) I'd forgotten how easy those actually are to make; the only problem is that they use up three bowls. Next week, I think I'll do butterscotch brownie bars.

We finished Read or Die, which was a rather cute bit of action-fluff. Poor DG now has only seen the end, and PB hasn't seen the finale. Ah, well.

The main attraction was The Ice Storm. Ah, the creepiest Pretty you've ever seen - underage Elijah Wood and Christina Ricci making out in an empty swimming pool. Unfortunately, no one else felt like sitting about discussing the moral focus of the movie - the Spouse gave it a try, but he's not really into that sort of deep literary analysis of a film. DG, who I think out of that crowd was my best shot at the kind of conversation I was after, just went home after the film. Not that I don't miss him at other times, but it's these sorts of situations where I most acutely miss JG . . .

. . . and it irritates me no end that I know both AH and DM are capable of at least having that particular kind of conversation about a movie. So their ditching deprives me not only of DM's company, but also a large part of my reason for wanting it shown.

Arrrrgggghhh.

And, if I call him tomorrow, I'm getting very, very close to my Scary Stalker Bitch From Hell quotient for the week.

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