omorka: (Lesbian Tea)
Confirmed: I really just don't like the taste of alcohol very much, nor the taste of hops. Beer is just not ever really going to work for me, nor any liquor neat.

Not that this is any great loss - the gouty aren't supposed to be drinking much anyway - but it's kind of nice to know that this isn't just a psychological thing.
omorka: (Baking Cookies)
I realized on Thursday that the frozen mixed cherries in the freezer had been there for nearly six months and were in danger of getting freezer burn, so I made a cherry pie (technically it's a cherry-berry pie, since the frozen cherry mix has a few blueberries and currants in there as well). I did a vented top instead of a lattice, which was probably a mistake since the top crust turned out a little bit soggy, but everything else turned out fine.

I have leftover apples from CMA that also need to turn into a pie before they go bad on me.

If I am not careful I will use up all my pie juju before Thanksgiving, but that might not be a terrible thing - it's likely to just be me, the Spouse, and the Boy this year. The usual three pies might be overkill.

Pie Update

Jul. 5th, 2015 05:35 am
omorka: (Baking Cookies)
Made a fresh mixed-berry pie for the 4th; it came out well, although I'm contemplating going against the recipe and putting it in a regular pre-baked pastry shell instead of a crumb crust next time - the pie filling stayed together okay, but the crust fell apart when cut.

Also, I pan-grilled a pork chop for dinner, so I'm going to have to be vegetarian for the next couple of days. (I wish I knew exactly how long. It'd be nice to have a thingy that measures uric acid levels the way diabetics have home blood sugar monitors.)
omorka: (McCoy Doubts It)
I know I bitched about my recent medical issues on Tumblr, but I don't think I mentioned them here when they happened. Short short version: we discovered that my recurring foot issues for the past three years or so were not the result of my injuring myself and then not remembering what I did; they were an atypical case of gout, or more specifically gouty arthritis. So now I'm on meds, a heavily restricted diet, and an occasional cane. The restricted diet was even more restricted up until a month ago, but now I've been cleared for pretty much anything vegetarian, plus occasional chicken and/or chicken broth (but no alcohol, except for the occasional splash of white wine for cooking). This has resulted in my having to learn to grocery shop, and to some extent cook, all over again.

Oddly enough, my father (who developed gout in his very late fifties but had recurring foot problems before then that I now suspect might have been related) was given much stronger meds and much looser dietary restrictions when he was diagnosed. I'm not sure if that's because the medical industry assumes that everything wrong with a woman is a lifestyle issue, while anything wrong with a man is clearly a disease, or if the underlying assumption is that men are just less likely to comply with the restricted diet.

On the bright side, I now have a socially acceptable excuse for turning down a whole host of fish and seafoods that I don't like anyway, so there's that.
omorka: (Baking Cookies)
I found a recipe for a quick chocolate pudding that is entirely cornstarch-based, no egg involved; you could replace the milk with almond milk and get a perfectly serviceable vegan dessert. It takes about ten minutes to make and is remarkably tasty; I don't miss the egg yolks at all.

I tried it tonight with brown sugar cooked with a little butter instead of white sugar and cocoa powder. The butterscotch flavor came out just fine, but without the cocoa to add a bit of bitterness and bulk it up a bit, it's too thin and too sweet - I do miss the egg on this version. Ah, well. It's still better than Jello instant, and almost as fast.

---

So far, I have failed to find a Bakery AU for either the Ghostbusters (any version) or the Monkees. (Dammit, I have a thing for foursomes, don't I?) In fact, there are remarkably few Monkees AUs at all, which given the structure of the show is a little bit surprising. I am not sure whether I think this is a relief or a minor disappointment.

I guess this is my fault for liking pre-Internet shows, but the Teeming Hordes usually come up with at least one ridiculous thing when I go looking for it.
omorka: (Garden Green)
So I just made some awesome soup. (Yeah, I know. I'm currently on Australia time.) It's based on a recipe from Desperation Dinners, which I mentioned a few posts back, but I un-did a couple of the "convenience" steps. They called it "Presto Pesto Chicken Soup," which I guess will still do for a name, although mine is a little less presto - it took me about 40 minutes from sticking the chicken breasts in the microwave to sitting down with a bowl.

2 T olive oil (I didn't actually measure, I just added enough to coat the bottom of the pot)
1 medium yellow onion, chopped (for between 3/4 cup and 1 cup)
2 boneless, skinless chicken breasts, fresh or partially thawed
2 cloves garlic, minced
4 cups chicken broth (or 2 cans)
1 can diced tomatoes
1/4 t dried basil (or one big pinch)
a scant 1/4 t dried oregano (or one very slightly smaller pinch)
salt & freshly ground black pepper
Worchestershire sauce
1/2 c half-and-half or light cream
1/3 c pesto
Grated Parmesan cheese, for garnish

Heat the olive oil over medium-high heat in a 4-quart or 5-quart pot and start chopping the onion, adding it to the hot oil as you chop. You are going to fry this onion up real good; you want it starting to turn golden, but not burning, so stir it as it fries. While it's doing that, slice the chicken breasts into bite-size pieces, about the right size to sit one at a time in a soup spoon. Add the chicken to the pot and stir it around into the onions; let it cook while you mince the garlic. Once the chicken has just barely turned white all over, with no visible pink, add the garlic; your onions should be all golden, with maybe a little bit of browning.

Add the chicken broth and the tomatoes and turn the heat up to high. Season with salt (how much will depend on how salty your broth is), fresh-ground black pepper, the basil and oregano, and a few good shakes of the Worchestershire sauce (between 1 t and 1 T, depending on how much you like Worchestershire sauce). Stir well and bring to a boil, then drop the heat to medium-low and go do something else for about 10 minutes.

When you come back, turn the heat off and let the soup stop simmering. Pour the half-and-half into the pot in a thin stream, stirring the whole time. Add the pesto and stir to combine. At this point, the soup will be a horrible greenish-pink color and you will wonder whether you have made a terrible mistake, but ladle yourself a bowl and sprinkle a good pinch of Parmesan over the top, because you have not. If you have some crusty bread, you might want to toast a couple of slices back during that ten-minute simmer. Enjoy; this'll serve two people by itself or four with bread and salad.
omorka: (Garden Green)
So I just made some awesome soup. (Yeah, I know. I'm currently on Australia time.) It's based on a recipe from Desperation Dinners, which I mentioned a few posts back, but I un-did a couple of the "convenience" steps. They called it "Presto Pesto Chicken Soup," which I guess will still do for a name, although mine is a little less presto - it took me about 40 minutes from sticking the chicken breasts in the microwave to sitting down with a bowl.

2 T olive oil (I didn't actually measure, I just added enough to coat the bottom of the pot)
1 medium yellow onion, chopped (for between 3/4 cup and 1 cup)
2 boneless, skinless chicken breasts, fresh or partially thawed
2 cloves garlic, minced
4 cups chicken broth (or 2 cans)
1 can diced tomatoes
1/4 t dried basil (or one big pinch)
a scant 1/4 t dried oregano (or one very slightly smaller pinch)
salt & freshly ground black pepper
Worchestershire sauce
1/2 c half-and-half or light cream
1/3 c pesto
Grated Parmesan cheese, for garnish

Heat the olive oil over medium-high heat in a 4-quart or 5-quart pot and start chopping the onion, adding it to the hot oil as you chop. You are going to fry this onion up real good; you want it starting to turn golden, but not burning, so stir it as it fries. While it's doing that, slice the chicken breasts into bite-size pieces, about the right size to sit one at a time in a soup spoon. Add the chicken to the pot and stir it around into the onions; let it cook while you mince the garlic. Once the chicken has just barely turned white all over, with no visible pink, add the garlic; your onions should be all golden, with maybe a little bit of browning.

Add the chicken broth and the tomatoes and turn the heat up to high. Season with salt (how much will depend on how salty your broth is), fresh-ground black pepper, the basil and oregano, and a few good shakes of the Worchestershire sauce (between 1 t and 1 T, depending on how much you like Worchestershire sauce). Stir well and bring to a boil, then drop the heat to medium-low and go do something else for about 10 minutes.

When you come back, turn the heat off and let the soup stop simmering. Pour the half-and-half into the pot in a thin stream, stirring the whole time. Add the pesto and stir to combine. At this point, the soup will be a horrible greenish-pink color and you will wonder whether you have made a terrible mistake, but ladle yourself a bowl and sprinkle a good pinch of Parmesan over the top, because you have not. If you have some crusty bread, you might want to toast a couple of slices back during that ten-minute simmer. Enjoy; this'll serve two people by itself or four with bread and salad.
omorka: (Baking Cookies)
So, two books I've finshed recently -

---

First, The Aritst and the Mathematician: The True Story of Nicholas Bourbaki, the Genius Mathematician Who Never Existed, by Amir D. Aczel.

This book covers some fascinating topics, but I hesitate to recommend it to anyone, because it's rather poorly written. Not terribly written, let me point out; I'd be more than pleased with this level of structure and flow from, say, one of my senior IB students, or even a college undergraduate. But it's puzzling from a professionally published book by a professor; in some ways, it reads as if it were a translation of a very good book by a competent but novice translator. The author has a tendency to repeat himself, and there are several places where he tries to give a general overview explanation of a mathematical (or, in some places, linguistic, artistic, or anthropological) concept that really doesn't take well to a generalized layman's explanation, leaving me as the reader almost as in the dark as I was before (or, in the case of some of the set theory and topology that I did already know, annoyed that he didn't explain it better).

At any rate, the book is about the history of the Bourbaki Group, a loose collection of French mathematicians from the 30s to the 60s who revised French mathematics (in the wake of the collapse of German mathematics over the 30s and 40s, especially) and set it on new, more rigorous footing. It's an interesting period; there's a shift from a very nationalistic sense of mathematics in Europe to a much more global outlook over that timeframe, and it's that shift that eventually kills off Nicholas Bourbaki (the pen name under which the group published) in the '80s. In the meantime, Bourbaki's big idea, the notion of mathematical structure, influenced the entire academic atmosphere in postwar France. It's a portion of the history of mathematics that deserves more attention than it gets (British and the tumultuous remains of German mathematics tend to get all the academic notice for the period). I'm just not sure this book, with its own structure problems, does it justice.

---

Second, Cheap. Fast. Good!, by Beverly Mills and Alicia Ross.

First, if you're a working parent cooking for children, you don't have major food sensitivity issues in the family, and you don't already have Mills & Ross's previous book, Desperation Dinners, go get it. Half-Price Books stores will often have a couple of copies in the Cooking section, unless someone else in the area has already discovered it. (They also have a book called Desperation Entertaining, which is worth picking up if you can get it cheaply, but isn't as generally useful as the other two.) It doesn't rank up there with Peg Bracken's I Hate To Cook Book in terms of absolutely lifesaving stuff - Skid Row Stroganoff is still the world's best comfort food, even if it looks like dogfood (although all skillet meals sort of look like dogfood) - but it's very good indeed. And you don't have to have a family for it to be useful, even though all the recipes are sized for four; anyone who arrives home at 6:30 and just wants dinner on the table without having to venture back out or eating after 8:00 will find it useful, and the extras can be lunches down the line.

Anyway, Cheap. Fast. Good! is the result of both authors having career wobbles due to the slow-motion collapse of the newspaper industry (they're both food columnists, and DD is largely a collection of recipes from their column together). When they suddenly found themselves with less discretionary income, at much the same time as their toddlers and elementary school kids turned into middle-schoolers and teenagers, they turned from focusing on getting meals done as soon as possible (the focus of DD, which specializes in 20-minute meals, and, to a lesser extent, DE) to getting them done in a reasonable amount of time without breaking the bank. The contrast with their earlier books is interesting, and instructive; they still use convenience foods, but they tend to stick with one or two per recipe instead of three or four. CFG has a larger focus on less-processed ingredients, too, including seasonal ones. They also have some helpful tips about bulk shopping, storing, and cooking ahead when you can.

There are a few issues; the biggest one is that anyone with food allergies will find large swaths of the cookbook simply unusable. If you're lactose intolerant or cooking for someone who is, for instance, you'll have to do a lot of modification for the book to be much use at all. (Gluten or nut allergies will require less modification, but there will still be a substantial number of recipes you won't be able to use as-is.) Similarly, if you're just fussy, you'll have to do a certain amount of adjusting; I substitute frozen green beans for canned every time they come up, for instance, even if they are a bit more expensive. I hate bell pepper, too, and they're quite fond of it, but so far substituting an equal amount of chopped celery (or, if it's only one of several vegetable ingredients, just omitting it) seems to be working out. And one of the authors must have a ketchup-loving kid, because it shows up with alarming frequency.

Still, overall, a worthwhile buy. Highly recommended, especially for those of us who are trying to eat out less but get home too late to sweat over an hour-and-a-half dinner.
omorka: (Baking Cookies)
So, two books I've finshed recently -

---

First, The Aritst and the Mathematician: The True Story of Nicholas Bourbaki, the Genius Mathematician Who Never Existed, by Amir D. Aczel.

This book covers some fascinating topics, but I hesitate to recommend it to anyone, because it's rather poorly written. Not terribly written, let me point out; I'd be more than pleased with this level of structure and flow from, say, one of my senior IB students, or even a college undergraduate. But it's puzzling from a professionally published book by a professor; in some ways, it reads as if it were a translation of a very good book by a competent but novice translator. The author has a tendency to repeat himself, and there are several places where he tries to give a general overview explanation of a mathematical (or, in some places, linguistic, artistic, or anthropological) concept that really doesn't take well to a generalized layman's explanation, leaving me as the reader almost as in the dark as I was before (or, in the case of some of the set theory and topology that I did already know, annoyed that he didn't explain it better).

At any rate, the book is about the history of the Bourbaki Group, a loose collection of French mathematicians from the 30s to the 60s who revised French mathematics (in the wake of the collapse of German mathematics over the 30s and 40s, especially) and set it on new, more rigorous footing. It's an interesting period; there's a shift from a very nationalistic sense of mathematics in Europe to a much more global outlook over that timeframe, and it's that shift that eventually kills off Nicholas Bourbaki (the pen name under which the group published) in the '80s. In the meantime, Bourbaki's big idea, the notion of mathematical structure, influenced the entire academic atmosphere in postwar France. It's a portion of the history of mathematics that deserves more attention than it gets (British and the tumultuous remains of German mathematics tend to get all the academic notice for the period). I'm just not sure this book, with its own structure problems, does it justice.

---

Second, Cheap. Fast. Good!, by Beverly Mills and Alicia Ross.

First, if you're a working parent cooking for children, you don't have major food sensitivity issues in the family, and you don't already have Mills & Ross's previous book, Desperation Dinners, go get it. Half-Price Books stores will often have a couple of copies in the Cooking section, unless someone else in the area has already discovered it. (They also have a book called Desperation Entertaining, which is worth picking up if you can get it cheaply, but isn't as generally useful as the other two.) It doesn't rank up there with Peg Bracken's I Hate To Cook Book in terms of absolutely lifesaving stuff - Skid Row Stroganoff is still the world's best comfort food, even if it looks like dogfood (although all skillet meals sort of look like dogfood) - but it's very good indeed. And you don't have to have a family for it to be useful, even though all the recipes are sized for four; anyone who arrives home at 6:30 and just wants dinner on the table without having to venture back out or eating after 8:00 will find it useful, and the extras can be lunches down the line.

Anyway, Cheap. Fast. Good! is the result of both authors having career wobbles due to the slow-motion collapse of the newspaper industry (they're both food columnists, and DD is largely a collection of recipes from their column together). When they suddenly found themselves with less discretionary income, at much the same time as their toddlers and elementary school kids turned into middle-schoolers and teenagers, they turned from focusing on getting meals done as soon as possible (the focus of DD, which specializes in 20-minute meals, and, to a lesser extent, DE) to getting them done in a reasonable amount of time without breaking the bank. The contrast with their earlier books is interesting, and instructive; they still use convenience foods, but they tend to stick with one or two per recipe instead of three or four. CFG has a larger focus on less-processed ingredients, too, including seasonal ones. They also have some helpful tips about bulk shopping, storing, and cooking ahead when you can.

There are a few issues; the biggest one is that anyone with food allergies will find large swaths of the cookbook simply unusable. If you're lactose intolerant or cooking for someone who is, for instance, you'll have to do a lot of modification for the book to be much use at all. (Gluten or nut allergies will require less modification, but there will still be a substantial number of recipes you won't be able to use as-is.) Similarly, if you're just fussy, you'll have to do a certain amount of adjusting; I substitute frozen green beans for canned every time they come up, for instance, even if they are a bit more expensive. I hate bell pepper, too, and they're quite fond of it, but so far substituting an equal amount of chopped celery (or, if it's only one of several vegetable ingredients, just omitting it) seems to be working out. And one of the authors must have a ketchup-loving kid, because it shows up with alarming frequency.

Still, overall, a worthwhile buy. Highly recommended, especially for those of us who are trying to eat out less but get home too late to sweat over an hour-and-a-half dinner.
omorka: (Baking Cookies)
So, two books I've finshed recently -

---

First, The Aritst and the Mathematician: The True Story of Nicholas Bourbaki, the Genius Mathematician Who Never Existed, by Amir D. Aczel.

This book covers some fascinating topics, but I hesitate to recommend it to anyone, because it's rather poorly written. Not terribly written, let me point out; I'd be more than pleased with this level of structure and flow from, say, one of my senior IB students, or even a college undergraduate. But it's puzzling from a professionally published book by a professor; in some ways, it reads as if it were a translation of a very good book by a competent but novice translator. The author has a tendency to repeat himself, and there are several places where he tries to give a general overview explanation of a mathematical (or, in some places, linguistic, artistic, or anthropological) concept that really doesn't take well to a generalized layman's explanation, leaving me as the reader almost as in the dark as I was before (or, in the case of some of the set theory and topology that I did already know, annoyed that he didn't explain it better).

At any rate, the book is about the history of the Bourbaki Group, a loose collection of French mathematicians from the 30s to the 60s who revised French mathematics (in the wake of the collapse of German mathematics over the 30s and 40s, especialiiy) and set it on new, more rigorous footing. It's an interesting period; there's a shift from a very nationalistic sense of mathematics in Europe to a much more global outlook over that timeframe, and it's that shift that eventually kills off Nicholas Bourbaki (the pen name under which the group published) in the '80s. In the meantime, Bourbaki's big idea, the notion of mathematical structure, influenced the entire academic atmosphere in postwar France. It's a portion of the history of mathematics that deserves more attention than it gets (British and the tumultuous remains of German mathematics tend to get all the academic notice for the period). I'm just not sure this book, with its own structure problems, does it justice.

---

Second, Cheap. Fast. Good!, by Beverly Mills and Alicia Ross.

First, if you're a working parent cooking for children, you don't have major food sensitivity issues in the family, and you don't already have Mills & Ross's previous book, Desperation Dinners, go get it. Half-Price Books stores will often have a couple of copies in the Cooking section, unless someone else in the area has already discovered it. (They also have a book called Desperation Entertaining, which is worth picking up if you can get it cheaply, but isn't as generally useful as the other two.) It doesn't rank up there with Peg Bracken's I Hate To Cook Book in terms of absolutely lifesaving stuff - Skid Row Stroganoff is still the world's best comfort food, even if it looks like dogfood (although all skillet meals sort of look like dogfood) - but it's very good indeed. And you don't have to have a family for it to be useful, even though all the recipes are sized for four; anyone who arrives home at 6:30 and just wants dinner on the table without having to venture back out or eating after 8:00 will find it useful, and the extras can be lunches down the line.

Anyway, Cheap. Fast. Good! is the result of both authors having career wobbles due to the slow-motion collapse of the newspaper industry (they're both food columnists, and DD is largely a collection of recipes from their column together). When they suddenly found themselves with less discretionary income, at much the same time as their toddlers and elementary school kids turned into middle-schoolers and teenagers, they turned from focusing on getting meals done as soon as possible (the focus of DD, which specializes in 20-minute meals, and, to a lesser extent, DE) to getting them done in a reasonable amount of time without breaking the bank. The contrast with their earlier books is interesting, and instructive; they still use convenience foods. but they tend to stick with one or two per recipe instead of three or four. CFG has a larger focus on less-processed ingredients, too, including seasonal ones. They also have some helpful tips about bulk shopping, storing, and cooking ahead when you can.

There are a few issues; the biggest one is that anyone with food allergies will find large swaths of the cookbook simply unusable. If you're lactose intolerant or cooking for someone who is, for instance, you'll have to do a lot of modification for the book to be much use at all. (Gluten or nut allergies will require less modification, but there will still be a substantial number of recipes you won't be able to use as-is.) Similarly, if you're just fussy, you'll have to do a certain amount of adjusting; I substitute frozen green beans for canned every time they come up, for instance, even if they are a bit more expensive. I hate bell pepper, too, and they're quite fond of it, but so far substituting an equal amount of chopped celery (or, if it's only one of several vegetable ingredients, just omitting it) seems to be working out. And one of the authors must have a ketchup-loving kid, because it shows up with alarming frequency.

Still, overall, a worthwhile buy. Highly recommended, especially for those of us who are trying to eat out less but get home too late to sweat over an hour-and-a-half dinner.
omorka: (Garden Green)
Two largely unrelated things that both involve food plants:

First - I bought a spearmint plant for the porch on a whim, seeing as I like a single spearmint leaf in my iced tea when I can get it. (I realize that at the point where one has put sugar, lemon, and a mint leaf in one's iced tea, it's no longer "tea" in any sense that a proper tea snob is bound to respect. I don't care all that much, though - Southerners are weird that way, and in at least this respect I take after my father's mother's family and their habits. I'm drinking an iced jasmine green with blackberry leaf and blackberry flavoring at the moment, with sugar and lemon, and it's awesome. Shut up.) Then I realized that I still have a lot of seeds from the last time I tried to do herbs from seed, and a lot of empty pots from when the crazy winter killed off all my plants (not that they'd have survived the following drought anyway, but I didn't replace any of them last spring). It's a little late for seeding in Houston, but eh, I figured I'd see if any of them were still any good. I planted a couple of different types of basil, two different types of tomato (I had a third, but it's not a container type), one pepper, one cucumber, parsley, mugwort, and bergamot mint. I also cleared a lot of the junk off of the porch so they'd get more light, and tossed a few cosmos seeds I'd gotten as a bonus into the hedge bed.

Today I dumped the two remaining partial bags of potting soil into the existing hedge bed, where there are a dead shrub and another one that's mostly dead - sending up a couple of shoots from the main trunk, but the branches are dry and leafless. I planted the makeshift raised bed with morning glories and moonflowers, figuring they'd use the dead hedge as a trellis and look better than the dead bush. I then had some morning glory seeds left over, so I found a couple of places along the back fence (which was partially knocked over in Ike and never really fixed, so it has gaps in it now) where there were remnants of potting soil from some of my previous experiments and planted them back there.

I don't normally do flowers. We'll see if these are at all successful.

---

Second - I bought a pair of round yellow fruit labeled "Meyer lemons" about a month ago. They were mislabeled, I think - they were clearly a cross between a Meyer lemon and something else, probably a blood orange from the internal color. When I tried the first one, it was sweet. It had some lemon flavor, but mostly it was just a generic tart citrus fruit.

I found the other one tonight and decided to use it before it went bad, so I squeezed it and drank the juice. It was fabulous! "Fresh squeezed lemonade" is a fairly good description. If they ever market this stuff, I might actually buy it.
omorka: (Garden Green)
Two largely unrelated things that both involve food plants:

First - I bought a spearmint plant for the porch on a whim, seeing as I like a single spearmint leaf in my iced tea when I can get it. (I realize that at the point where one has put sugar, lemon, and a mint leaf in one's iced tea, it's no longer "tea" in any sense that a proper tea snob is bound to respect. I don't care all that much, though - Southerners are weird that way, and in at least this respect I take after my father's mother's family and their habits. I'm drinking an iced jasmine green with blackberry leaf and blackberry flavoring at the moment, with sugar and lemon, and it's awesome. Shut up.) Then I realized that I still have a lot of seeds from the last time I tried to do herbs from seed, and a lot of empty pots from when the crazy winter killed off all my plants (not that they'd have survived the following drought anyway, but I didn't replace any of them last spring). It's a little late for seeding in Houston, but eh, I figured I'd see if any of them were still any good. I planted a couple of different types of basil, two different types of tomato (I had a third, but it's not a container type), one pepper, one cucumber, parsley, mugwort, and bergamot mint. I also cleared a lot of the junk off of the porch so they'd get more light, and tossed a few cosmos seeds I'd gotten as a bonus into the hedge bed.

Today I dumped the two remaining partial bags of potting soil into the existing hedge bed, where there are a dead shrub and another one that's mostly dead - sending up a couple of shoots from the main trunk, but the branches are dry and leafless. I planted the makeshift raised bed with morning glories and moonflowers, figuring they'd use the dead hedge as a trellis and look better than the dead bush. I then had some morning glory seeds left over, so I found a couple of places along the back fence (which was partially knocked over in Ike and never really fixed, so it has gaps in it now) where there were remnants of potting soil from some of my previous experiments and planted them back there.

I don't normally do flowers. We'll see if these are at all successful.

---

Second - I bought a pair of round yellow fruit labeled "Meyer lemons" about a month ago. They were mislabeled, I think - they were clearly a cross between a Meyer lemon and something else, probably a blood orange from the internal color. When I tried the first one, it was sweet. It had some lemon flavor, but mostly it was just a generic tart citrus fruit.

I found the other one tonight and decided to use it before it went bad, so I squeezed it and drank the juice. It was fabulous! "Fresh squeezed lemonade" is a fairly good description. If they ever market this stuff, I might actually buy it.
omorka: (Baking Cookies)
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Pasta. If I have to be more specific, fettucini and broccoli with cream sauce, but I'd be happier if you'll let me stick with the vague answer, as I'd hate to give up penne, fusilli, ravioli, etc.
omorka: (Baking Cookies)
[Error: unknown template qotd]

Pasta. If I have to be more specific, fettucini and broccoli with cream sauce, but I'd be happier if you'll let me stick with the vague answer, as I'd hate to give up penne, fusilli, ravioli, etc.
omorka: (Baking Cookies)
I enjoy lentils quite a bit.

I'm really not very fond of raisins.

I wish the pre-packaged vegan instant soup company I've been getting lunches from (it's one of the few ways I can get a reasonably nutritious hot lunch when I don't have access to a microwave) didn't put raisins in their lentil pilaf.
omorka: (Baking Cookies)
I enjoy lentils quite a bit.

I'm really not very fond of raisins.

I wish the pre-packaged vegan instant soup company I've been getting lunches from (it's one of the few ways I can get a reasonably nutritious hot lunch when I don't have access to a microwave) didn't put raisins in their lentil pilaf.
omorka: (Baking Cookies)
Back. Much better!

And so I was looking up wheat genetics on Wikipedia (don't ask - it involves a book published so long ago that it uses the term "germ plasm" repeatedly, because DNA hadn't been discovered yet), and ended up pulling up the Worst Infographic Ever. Seriously, I was saying to myself, "Self, that is not where they grow most of the wheat in Canada, and I know because we drove through most of it." But I can't figure out any particular rhyme or reason to where the dots are placed Nevermind, there's an explanation on the one for barley (which is just as bad), and I should have been able to figure it out from the China dot - they're roughly clustered around the capital cities. Also, if you have both ones and tens, and you have extra space after placing all your tens, it'd be nice to go ahead and place the ones, too. Let's maintain a constant level of precision, okay?

Fortunately, this infographic was much better.
omorka: (Baking Cookies)
Back. Much better!

And so I was looking up wheat genetics on Wikipedia (don't ask - it involves a book published so long ago that it uses the term "germ plasm" repeatedly, because DNA hadn't been discovered yet), and ended up pulling up the Worst Infographic Ever. Seriously, I was saying to myself, "Self, that is not where they grow most of the wheat in Canada, and I know because we drove through most of it." But I can't figure out any particular rhyme or reason to where the dots are placed Nevermind, there's an explanation on the one for barley (which is just as bad), and I should have been able to figure it out from the China dot - they're roughly clustered around the capital cities. Also, if you have both ones and tens, and you have extra space after placing all your tens, it'd be nice to go ahead and place the ones, too. Let's maintain a constant level of precision, okay?

Fortunately, this infographic was much better.
omorka: (Broccoli Fractal)
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I wouldn't. One person's meat is another person's poison (or perhaps poisson), after all. Food is a matter of taste, and of TAST-R genes, and we can't help our genetics and chemistry. If I must pick one, then let it be the sorts of fake, chemical-filled mayonnaise substitutes that bear the label 'salad dressing' because they can't legally call it mayo. That crap is nasty, yo.

If, however, I could instead merely ban one particular food from ever appearing in a room while I'm occupying it, it would be shrimp. The smell alone is enough to make me gag, and lately there have been 'stealth shrimp' appearing in things that don't advertise it. While I know intellectually that it can't possibly smell like that to the people who are eating it, that this is some variation in body chemistry that makes the little pink bottom-feeders absolutely nauseating for me and perfectly edible to other people, that doesn't make watching other people put them in their mouths voluntarily any easier.
omorka: (Broccoli Fractal)
[Error: unknown template qotd]

I wouldn't. One person's meat is another person's poison (or perhaps poisson), after all. Food is a matter of taste, and of TAST-R genes, and we can't help our genetics and chemistry. If I must pick one, then let it be the sorts of fake, chemical-filled mayonnaise substitutes that bear the label 'salad dressing' because they can't legally call it mayo. That crap is nasty, yo.

If, however, I could instead merely ban one particular food from ever appearing in a room while I'm occupying it, it would be shrimp. The smell alone is enough to make me gag, and lately there have been 'stealth shrimp' appearing in things that don't advertise it. While I know intellectually that it can't possibly smell like that to the people who are eating it, that this is some variation in body chemistry that makes the little pink bottom-feeders absolutely nauseating for me and perfectly edible to other people, that doesn't make watching other people put them in their mouths voluntarily any easier.

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