omorka: (Zaftig-formal)
Okay, so I've probably been reading too much about the Quiverfull movement and its various brethren among the hyper-conservative (by which I actually mean reactionary radical) fundamental and evangelical Christian sects. But one thing I keep noting over and over in the writings of escapees from these groups, especially ex-Quiverfull daughters, is the complaint that they were always cold in the winter because they weren't allowed to wear pants.

This confuses me every time I read it, because, while I am to some extent the exact opposite of what their modesty doctrines assume, I also don't wear pants, nor did the majority of women in Europe and the US until well into the century just past, and when I have problems with wintry gusts up my skirts, it's almost always because I failed to prepare adequately - generally wearing a skirt meant for a Houston spring in the winter and going barelegged underneath. It is entirely possible to deal with the weather of, say, Boston without bifurcated outer garments. And so, for the benefit of any modesty-doctrine girls (or just other skirt-lovers) who might stumble across this, I present: How Our Foremothers Didn't Freeze Their Kneecaps Off.

It's all about the foundation garments )
omorka: (Zaftig-formal)
Okay, so I've probably been reading too much about the Quiverfull movement and its various brethren among the hyper-conservative (by which I actually mean reactionary radical) fundamental and evangelical Christian sects. But one thing I keep noting over and over in the writings of escapees from these groups, especially ex-Quiverfull daughters, is the complaint that they were always cold in the winter because they weren't allowed to wear pants.

This confuses me every time I read it, because, while I am to some extent the exact opposite of what their modesty doctrines assume, I also don't wear pants, nor did the majority of women in Europe and the US until well into the century just past, and when I have problems with wintry gusts up my skirts, it's almost always because I failed to prepare adequately - generally wearing a skirt meant for a Houston spring in the winter and going barelegged underneath. It is entirely possible to deal with the weather of, say, Boston without bifurcated outer garments. And so, for the benefit of any modesty-doctrine girls (or just other skirt-lovers) who might stumble across this, I present: How Our Foremothers Didn't Freeze Their Kneecaps Off.

It's all about the foundation garments )
omorka: (Zaftig-formal)
Does this dress make any sense to anyone else? It seems both immensely unflattering (to the point that I can't imagine a frame it would do anything for) and rather impractical to me, but maybe I'm just not getting it.
omorka: (Zaftig-formal)
Does this dress make any sense to anyone else? It seems both immensely unflattering (to the point that I can't imagine a frame it would do anything for) and rather impractical to me, but maybe I'm just not getting it.
omorka: (Zaftig-formal)
I have thought for the longest time that I didn't like socks.

I think it's actually the case that I don't like shorter-than-knee-length socks, very much don't like white socks, dislike having to hike my socks up every twelve minutes, and hate shoes that require socks.

Of course, realizing that if I take up sock knitting I am committing to knitting socks that will fit my very fat, very curvy legs all the way up to at least the knee and probably the mid-thigh is not encouraging me to start.
omorka: (Zaftig-formal)
I have thought for the longest time that I didn't like socks.

I think it's actually the case that I don't like shorter-than-knee-length socks, very much don't like white socks, dislike having to hike my socks up every twelve minutes, and hate shoes that require socks.

Of course, realizing that if I take up sock knitting I am committing to knitting socks that will fit my very fat, very curvy legs all the way up to at least the knee and probably the mid-thigh is not encouraging me to start.
omorka: (Naked Belly)
There's no such thing as an arbitrary number. Almost every time a number is assigned to something by a human, at least part of that number refers to something. An ISBN tells you the book's publisher, for instance. But humans also tend to forget referents, or to change things without changing the numbering scheme, so that numbers that once made some sort of sense now appear arbitrary.

A Tale of Two Temperature Scales )

Now, I told you that story so I could tell you this one.

A Tale of Two Sizing Scales )
omorka: (Naked Belly)
There's no such thing as an arbitrary number. Almost every time a number is assigned to something by a human, at least part of that number refers to something. An ISBN tells you the book's publisher, for instance. But humans also tend to forget referents, or to change things without changing the numbering scheme, so that numbers that once made some sort of sense now appear arbitrary.

A Tale of Two Temperature Scales )

Now, I told you that story so I could tell you this one.

A Tale of Two Sizing Scales )
omorka: (Boys In Grey - Comic)
So, I think I have a costume, more or less.

None of it is perfect. I'm going to have to learn to sew for that. (And possibly have to learn to make patterns, although I suspect that there is a serviceable jumpsuit pattern out there somewhere.) But it's all good enough, and since this is a hall costume, not a masquerade entry, good enough is a stopping point.

Went out this afternoon (well, yesterday afternoon at this point, but I'm nocturnal again, so I haven't slept yet, thus it is still logical Monday by my internal calendar) in search of shoes that would do and the correct elbow pads. I ended up with two pairs of shoes - one pair of monochrome black high-top sneakers, and one pair of heavy-soled monochrome black workboots. Neither is perfect, again - the correct boots are monochrome black military surplus jungle boots, which I cannot find anywhere in my size, because I have girly-girl feet and apparently women with girly-girl feet do not join the Army in sufficient numbers for their suppliers to make extra shoes in my size. But the workboots are close enough - part of the upper is black canvas rather than something shiny, which isn't right, but the body of the shoe and the soles are right, and they'll look fine as long as someone doesn't decide to study my feet. I got the sneakers because I do not currently own a pair of high-tops at all, and if I decide to, say, go to the dance, I'd like to have something that won't mess up the overall look of the costume but won't be incredibly clumsy.

I couldn't find elbow pads with a circular pad area, much less one with the correct three ridges across, so
I got the closest thing I could find, and I will attempt to sew something like three straight lines (ulp) across, then dye them gray. This required that I also pick up a packet of Rit dye. This may get complicated. This also, in turn, required that I buy latex gloves. (One nice thing about the cartoon suits, as opposed to the movie ones, is that they don't require the heavy black gloves; Ray wears them in all of about five episodes, and Peter in maybe one, and the others never wear them at all.)

I also need to sew and then iron on the patches for the jumpsuit. I suppose I could just do a really good job sewing them on and not bother with the ironing, but I do not trust my sewing skills that much.

But at the end of all this, I will have a reasonable approximation of the uniform Janine is wearing in two of her first three appearances in the 'Buster jumpsuit/Venkman's regular jumpsuit from the cartoon.

Now I need to think about accessorizing, if I'm going to wear this again. And how I'm going to manage a correct first-movie suit. And the version Janine wears in the later seasons, when she has a uniform of her own. And whether a second-movie suit is even possible.
omorka: (Boys In Grey - Comic)
So, I think I have a costume, more or less.

None of it is perfect. I'm going to have to learn to sew for that. (And possibly have to learn to make patterns, although I suspect that there is a serviceable jumpsuit pattern out there somewhere.) But it's all good enough, and since this is a hall costume, not a masquerade entry, good enough is a stopping point.

Went out this afternoon (well, yesterday afternoon at this point, but I'm nocturnal again, so I haven't slept yet, thus it is still logical Monday by my internal calendar) in search of shoes that would do and the correct elbow pads. I ended up with two pairs of shoes - one pair of monochrome black high-top sneakers, and one pair of heavy-soled monochrome black workboots. Neither is perfect, again - the correct boots are monochrome black military surplus jungle boots, which I cannot find anywhere in my size, because I have girly-girl feet and apparently women with girly-girl feet do not join the Army in sufficient numbers for their suppliers to make extra shoes in my size. But the workboots are close enough - part of the upper is black canvas rather than something shiny, which isn't right, but the body of the shoe and the soles are right, and they'll look fine as long as someone doesn't decide to study my feet. I got the sneakers because I do not currently own a pair of high-tops at all, and if I decide to, say, go to the dance, I'd like to have something that won't mess up the overall look of the costume but won't be incredibly clumsy.

I couldn't find elbow pads with a circular pad area, much less one with the correct three ridges across, so
I got the closest thing I could find, and I will attempt to sew something like three straight lines (ulp) across, then dye them gray. This required that I also pick up a packet of Rit dye. This may get complicated. This also, in turn, required that I buy latex gloves. (One nice thing about the cartoon suits, as opposed to the movie ones, is that they don't require the heavy black gloves; Ray wears them in all of about five episodes, and Peter in maybe one, and the others never wear them at all.)

I also need to sew and then iron on the patches for the jumpsuit. I suppose I could just do a really good job sewing them on and not bother with the ironing, but I do not trust my sewing skills that much.

But at the end of all this, I will have a reasonable approximation of the uniform Janine is wearing in two of her first three appearances in the 'Buster jumpsuit/Venkman's regular jumpsuit from the cartoon.

Now I need to think about accessorizing, if I'm going to wear this again. And how I'm going to manage a correct first-movie suit. And the version Janine wears in the later seasons, when she has a uniform of her own. And whether a second-movie suit is even possible.
omorka: (Default)
Okay, I have several knitted hat patterns here, and some of the sizing is just not making any sense. I have a couple of patterns for which their women's size (or medium) is clearly larger than the men's size (large) for other patterns, and the stretchiness of the knit (or lack thereof) doesn't seem to have anything to do with it.

Flist, if you would please do me a favor, could you:

(a) post your hat size, if you know it (I have enough friends who wear fedoras or panamas that this should be a simple matter of checking inside the crown)

(b) if you don't know it and you have a tape measure around, could you measure your head circumference (parallel to the floor, just above the eyebrows) for me?

I'm a 21 1/4" circumference, which puts me somewhere between a 6 3/4 and a 6 7/8 hat size. I vaguely remember my MOB fedora being a 6 7/8, so that sounds right.
omorka: (Default)
Okay, I have several knitted hat patterns here, and some of the sizing is just not making any sense. I have a couple of patterns for which their women's size (or medium) is clearly larger than the men's size (large) for other patterns, and the stretchiness of the knit (or lack thereof) doesn't seem to have anything to do with it.

Flist, if you would please do me a favor, could you:

(a) post your hat size, if you know it (I have enough friends who wear fedoras or panamas that this should be a simple matter of checking inside the crown)

(b) if you don't know it and you have a tape measure around, could you measure your head circumference (parallel to the floor, just above the eyebrows) for me?

I'm a 21 1/4" circumference, which puts me somewhere between a 6 3/4 and a 6 7/8 hat size. I vaguely remember my MOB fedora being a 6 7/8, so that sounds right.
omorka: (Zaftig-formal)
After contemplating it for a while, I finally ordered a pair of boots. They're only mid-calf length; no one's going to mistake these for fetishwear, although they might go clubbing well. They're also brown rather than black; the black ones were out of stock, with no indication of when they expected to get them back in. Still, brown may actually go better with some of my outfits.

They arrived today, so I tried them on. In the process, I discovered that some fool had sewn the tongue to one eyelet-side. This was not working for me (thick ankles), so I decided to fix it. I may not be very handy sewing, but I know how to pick a seam. Once the tongue was floating free like it's supposed to be, getting them laced up was a lot easier. There's still a bit of skin showing on either side of the tongue at the very top of the boot, but for the most part it laces up correctly. The foot is a bit too long (these are 7s - they didn't have 6.5 wides, and I was worried about a 6.5 being too narrow; I'm guessing from the fit I made the right choice), but my feet don't slide around or anything. And the heels are wide enough that I don't feel like I'm wobbling, without being huge and chunky.

So far I'm not sure if they were worth shelling out what I paid for them, but overall I'm pleased.
omorka: (Zaftig-formal)
After contemplating it for a while, I finally ordered a pair of boots. They're only mid-calf length; no one's going to mistake these for fetishwear, although they might go clubbing well. They're also brown rather than black; the black ones were out of stock, with no indication of when they expected to get them back in. Still, brown may actually go better with some of my outfits.

They arrived today, so I tried them on. In the process, I discovered that some fool had sewn the tongue to one eyelet-side. This was not working for me (thick ankles), so I decided to fix it. I may not be very handy sewing, but I know how to pick a seam. Once the tongue was floating free like it's supposed to be, getting them laced up was a lot easier. There's still a bit of skin showing on either side of the tongue at the very top of the boot, but for the most part it laces up correctly. The foot is a bit too long (these are 7s - they didn't have 6.5 wides, and I was worried about a 6.5 being too narrow; I'm guessing from the fit I made the right choice), but my feet don't slide around or anything. And the heels are wide enough that I don't feel like I'm wobbling, without being huge and chunky.

So far I'm not sure if they were worth shelling out what I paid for them, but overall I'm pleased.
omorka: (Zaftig-formal)
For most of my life, I paid as little attention to clothing as possible.

random autobiographical rambling behind the cut )

Which brings me to my current predicament: a number of the broomstick skirts purchased when I was first building a teaching wardrobe (read: the first time I both needed business-casual sorts of clothes and had the money available to buy them) have entered one of the typical failure modes for such items of clothing. The elastic has failed. To my chagrin, on at least three of the skirts the elastic is the only thing that has failed on the skirt; it is otherwise perfectly serviceable, without rips or stains.

Now, the ones that have obvious fatigue or other issues, I am perfectly willing to retire. But there are those three that I really would prefer not to send to the fabric-scrap pile without at least trying to revive them. So, those of you who are somewhat familiar with sewing: how difficult would it be to either replace the elastic, or, failing that, add a drawstring to the skirt? Can the second be done without cutting multiple holes in the waistband? Is there anyone local with a sewing machine who can give me a hand?
omorka: (Zaftig-formal)
For most of my life, I paid as little attention to clothing as possible.

random autobiographical rambling behind the cut )

Which brings me to my current predicament: a number of the broomstick skirts purchased when I was first building a teaching wardrobe (read: the first time I both needed business-casual sorts of clothes and had the money available to buy them) have entered one of the typical failure modes for such items of clothing. The elastic has failed. To my chagrin, on at least three of the skirts the elastic is the only thing that has failed on the skirt; it is otherwise perfectly serviceable, without rips or stains.

Now, the ones that have obvious fatigue or other issues, I am perfectly willing to retire. But there are those three that I really would prefer not to send to the fabric-scrap pile without at least trying to revive them. So, those of you who are somewhat familiar with sewing: how difficult would it be to either replace the elastic, or, failing that, add a drawstring to the skirt? Can the second be done without cutting multiple holes in the waistband? Is there anyone local with a sewing machine who can give me a hand?
omorka: (Zaftig-formal)
So I realized that I was in danger of a wardrobe malfunction recently.

Girly clothing stuff, possibly slightly TMI )
omorka: (Zaftig-formal)
So I realized that I was in danger of a wardrobe malfunction recently.

Girly clothing stuff, possibly slightly TMI )

Profile

omorka: (Default)
omorka

July 2017

S M T W T F S
      1
2345678
9101112131415
161718192021 22
23242526272829
3031     

Syndicate

RSS Atom

Most Popular Tags

Style Credit

Expand Cut Tags

No cut tags
Page generated Jul. 24th, 2017 08:47 am
Powered by Dreamwidth Studios